honor - The Blanket An honor code is like a blanket: it...

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The Blanket An honor code is like a blanket: it covers the entire college community. Students and faculty, surrounded by the blanket, feel close together. A passerby easily identifies an honor code student by his or her behavior. Soft linen coats the core cotton fibers of the blanket. People change over time, so does the blanket. Tolerance and respect should form the core of the blanket, coupled with trust between students and faculty. Eighty percent of the blanket’s cotton fiber should include tolerance and respect for others. Respect includes not ridiculing another person’s appearance or beliefs; toleration means not casting a prejudice upon others because of their beliefs. Personally, I see myself as a secular Asian American. Thus, talking about religion in the Bible Belt irritates me. Seemingly, everyone here is Christian. Last year a student in my Precalculus class asked me about my religion. “Atheist,” I casually replied. A bare silence hung around the room. No noise appeared. It seemed as if every action in class stopped. But on the inside, I could feel the eyes of my classmates staring at me, chastising me for being an atheist. Because of the silence, I felt ashamed of my decision to say that word. From then on, I decided that when anyone approaches me
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honor - The Blanket An honor code is like a blanket: it...

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