Strong Acid Chemistry Handout

Strong Acid Chemistry Handout - pH: Strong Acids. A....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
pH: Strong Acids. A. Introduction. ................................................................................................... 1 B. Strong acids: an example . .............................................................................. 1 C. Strong acids: general. ..................................................................................... 2 D. Strong bases. .................................................................................................. 3 E. More problems . .............................................................................................. 4 F. What if you have both? [optional]. ................................................................. 4 G. Normality [optional]. ..................................................................................... 5 H. Answers . ........................................................................................................ 7 A. Introduction This handout follows Water. (Equations from the Water handout are indicated here with the suffix W.) In pure (or neutral) water, [H + ] = [OH - ] = 1.0x10 - 7 M. (Eq 2-W.) However, addition of some solutes to water causes these numbers to change. Substances that raise [H + ] are known as acids, substances that raise [OH - ] are bases . Recall that a change in one of these concentrations causes an inverse change in the other, according to Eq 3-W. And recall that pH is simply a way to denote [H + ], Eq 4-W. One group of acids and bases is particularly simple, the strong acids and bases. We start by looking at a particular example of a strong acid, and then we generalize. Acids and bases that are not strong are called weak. The next handout is on weak acids and bases. B. Strong acids: an example Consider a 0.10 M aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. (1) HCl (aq) H + (aq) + Cl - (aq) In solution, HCl ionizes, to form H + and Cl - ions. In fact, this reaction is essentially 100% complete; the reverse reaction is negligible. (Note that Eq 1 has a unidirectional arrow rather than a double arrow .) Further, the balanced equation shows that each mole of HCl produces 1 mol of H + . As a result, [H + ] = the acid concentration. In this case, the solution is 0.10 M HCl; therefore [H + ] = 0.10 M.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
pH: Strong Acids. Page 2 C. Strong acids: general Strong acids are acids that are completely ionized. Therefore [H + ] is readily determined by writing the balanced equation showing ion formation, so you know how many H + you get from each acid molecule. In the example of Sect B, the balanced equation (Eq 1) shows 1 mol acid 1 mol H + . Therefore [H + ] = [acid]. How do you know which acids are strong? The bad news is that you just need to know the list of strong acids. The good news is that the list is very short, and some members of the list aren’t even very important. Further, only one of the strong acids is more complicated than the example discussed above. The strong acids
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/14/2011 for the course CHEM 152 taught by Professor Chiu during the Spring '08 term at University of Washington.

Page1 / 7

Strong Acid Chemistry Handout - pH: Strong Acids. A....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online