Section 1.1-1.3

Section 1.1-1.3 - Section 1.1-1.3 Use sentences to express...

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Section 1.1-1.3 Use sentences to express ideas and communicate ideas to one another: can use two grammatically distinct sentences in English to express the same idea: Romeo loves Juliet Juliet is loved by Romeo Ideas can refer to thoughts or concepts Concepts neither true nor false “Turtles!” Instead of ideas, we want to talk about: PROPOSITIONS Proposition asserts something is the case o Can be expressed by a declarative sentence o MUST be either true or false Every proposition has a truth-value (true or false) Don’t have to know if they are true or false, they just have to be able to be true or false ‘God exists’ o Compound Proposition: one sentence with two or more propositions ‘either [it’s raining] or [it’s not raining]’ Compound proposition because both parts of the sentence can be true/false o Disjunctive Compound Propositions: use or, either one is or the other one is true See example above o Conjunctive Compound Propositions: each one of the
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2011 for the course PHIL 045 taught by Professor Hopper during the Fall '07 term at GWU.

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Section 1.1-1.3 - Section 1.1-1.3 Use sentences to express...

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