Section 1.4-1.6

Section 1.4-1.6 - Section 1.4-1.6 Review: Propositionso Can...

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Section 1.4-1.6 Review: Propositions- o Can be expressed by a declarative sentence o Must be either true or false (truth-value) o Need propositions to form arguments Arguments o Consist of premise and conclusion Proposition has to occupy the place of the premise and conclusion Section 1.4-1.6 Argument vs. explanation Both arguments and explanations use reasons To distinguish explanations from arguments: o 1. Take sentence and translate it into ‘x because y’ o 2. Ask: is x in question or is x assumed to be true? If x is in question, it is an argument If x assumed to be true, it is an explanation, and y explains why x is the way it is o Ex. Number 4 in book. If it is an argument, c would be: x- time must be something real (because) y- changes are real and changes happen over time… It is an ARGUMENT because x is in question Two kinds of arguments, two different ways conclusion can follow from the premises o The conclusion probably follows from the premises (inductive)
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This note was uploaded on 03/16/2011 for the course PHIL 045 taught by Professor Hopper during the Fall '07 term at GWU.

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Section 1.4-1.6 - Section 1.4-1.6 Review: Propositionso Can...

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