Theoretical Background for the Camera Spectrophotometer

Theoretical Background for the Camera Spectrophotometer -...

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Electromagnetic radiation Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) is the type of energy that encompasses light, heat, and x-rays. It can be conveniently described using a sinusoidal wave model, where the properties of the radiation depend on the wavelength, frequency, and other parameters of the wave. For some purposes, usually when discussing the absorption and transmittance of the energy of the radiation, it makes more sense to describe the energy as a stream of light particles called photons , where the energy of the photons is proportional to the frequency of the radiation. The wave/particle duality applies to all elementary particles, and should be used as a complementary, rather than contradictory, description of the movement of the radiation. Wave properties of electromagnetic radiation Some useful deFnitions and equations: Amplitude (A): The height of the wave (±g. 1) Wavelength ( λ ) : The distance between two crests of the wave (±g. 1) Crest and trough : The highest and lowest points, respectively, of a wave (±g. 1) Speed of light ( c ) - The velocity of radiation as it travels through a vacuum. This quantity is the same for all forms of electromagnetic radiation, from x-rays to light to radio waves, and is constant within a particular transportation medium.The speed of light in vacuum is 2.99792 x 10 8 m/s. The speed of light in air is only 0.03% slower, and c in either medium is usually just rounded off to 3.00 x 10 8 m/s. Frequency ( ν ) : The number of waves that pass a ±xed point per second Period (T) : The number of seconds it takes for a wave to pass a ±xed point Theoretical Background for the Camera Spectrophotometer http://www.asdlib.org/onlineArticles/elabware/Scheeline_Kelly_Spectrophotometer/H. .. 1 of 6
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This note was uploaded on 03/15/2011 for the course FISICA 101 taught by Professor Chavez during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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Theoretical Background for the Camera Spectrophotometer -...

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