Chapter 5 Summary - British subjects. British subjects were...

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Adrian Cappuccitti Chapter 5: Severing the Bonds of Empire 1754-1774 Dr. Ouattara / HIST 2110 British colonies were surrounded by possibly hostile neighbors during the middle of the eighteenth century. Indians, the Spanish, and the French surrounded colonies along the Atlantic seaboard. The seven years’ war came about from conflict between the British, French, Native Americans, and settlers due to the desire for control of western land. France ended up ceding most of its North American territories to Britain after England declared war. After being controlled by parliament for too long, Americans believed that they should be able to elect representatives that live close in order to be represented properly. As England began to impose more taxes, Americans felt their freedom was in danger and believed that authority should lie with the people of the colonies. Americans wanted to resist Parliament yet remain
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Unformatted text preview: British subjects. British subjects were entitled to the right to consent to taxation, but it had not been granted to colonists under the Stamp Act. The Sons of Liberty drew people to get involved in political issues as most ordinary Americans had not been involved previously, and they cre-ated rituals to teach Americans reasons for resistance to the townshend acts. Samuel Adams was a member of The Sons of Liberty that widened the movement among Massachusetts residents. When parliament imposed the Tea Act in on the colonies in May of 1773, it was an attempt to save the East India Tea Company from bankruptcy. Citizens took it as Parliament exercising its right to tax them, and prevented the tea from being uploaded on the ships through the Boston Tea Party, where men dressed as Indians dumped the tea from the ships in response to the taxes....
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2011 for the course HIST 2110 taught by Professor Koontz during the Fall '08 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

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