It all begins with a subject and a verb

It all begins with a subject and a verb - Compound &...

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Compound & complex sentences, coordinating conjunctions, and more It all begins with a subject and a verb, which can form an independent clause. A sentence can contain more than one independent clause—ha ha, yes, we all know that. Now— A sentence can also contain both independent and dependant clauses--as long as there is an independent clause that can hold the entire sentence. Therefore, there are “generally” two kinds of sentences with silly grammatical names: “Compound Sentences” and “Complex Sentences.” Like everything in life, of course, there are sentences that consist both of them in one sentence, but those sentences need extra attention—for grammar and punctuation. 1. Compound Sentence—consists of two or more independent clauses linked by a comma (or commas if there are more than two independent clauses) that comes before a coordinating conjunction. ****FANBOYS (FOR, AND, NOR, BUT, OR, YET, SO) In other words, think about two (or more) individuals holding each other’s hands
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It all begins with a subject and a verb - Compound &...

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