Logical Fallacies

Logical Fallacies - Logical Fallacies Fallacies are common...

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Logical Fallacies Fallacies are common errors in reasoning that will undermine the logic of your argument. Fallacies can be either illegitimate arguments or irrelevant points, and are often identified because they lack evidence that supports their claim. Avoid these common fallacies in your own arguments and watch for them in the arguments of others. Slippery slope: This is a conclusion based on the premise that if A happens, then eventually through a series of small steps, through B, C,. .., X, Y, Z will happen, too, basically equating A and Z. So, if we don't want Z to occur, A must not be allowed to occur either. (1) If we ban SUVs because they are bad for the environment eventually the government will ban all cars, so we should not ban SUVs. In this example the author is equating banning Hummers with banning all cars, which is not the same thing. Hasty Generalization: This is a conclusion based on insufficient or biased evidence. In other words, you are rushing to a conclusion before you have all the relevant facts. (2) Even though it's only the first day, I can tell this is going to be a boring course. In this example the author is basing their evaluation of the entire course on only one class, and on the first day which is notoriously boring and full of housekeeping tasks for most courses. To make a fair and reasonable evaluation the author must attend several classes, and possibly even examine the textbook, talk to the professor, or talk to others who have previously finished the course in order to have sufficient evidence to base a conclusion on. Post hoc ergo propter hoc (after a thing therefore caused by the thing):
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2011 for the course ENGL 1101 taught by Professor Kirlew during the Fall '08 term at Georgia State.

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Logical Fallacies - Logical Fallacies Fallacies are common...

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