ClassQ ch02

ClassQ ch02 - QUESTION Seen from the northern latitudes...

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Seen from the northern latitudes (mid-northern hemisphere), the star Polaris A. is never above the horizon during the day. B. always sets directly in the west. C. is always above the northern horizon. D. is never visible during the winter. E. is the brightest star in the sky. QUESTION
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An observer on Earth's equator would find A. the celestial equator passing at 45 degrees above the northern horizon. B. The celestial equator passing at 45 degrees above the southern horizon. C. that the celestial equator coincides with the horizon. D. the celestial equator passing directly overhead. E. None of the above are true. QUESTION
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An observer at Earth's geographic North Pole would find _______ A. the celestial equator passing at 45 degrees above the northern horizon. B. The celestial equator passing at 45 degrees above the southern horizon. C. that the celestial equator coincides with the horizon. D. the celestial equator passing directly overhead. E. None of the above are true. QUESTION
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An observer on Earth's geographic North Pole would find A. Polaris directly overhead. B. Polaris 40° above the northern horizon. C. that the celestial equator coincides with the horizon. D. that the celestial equator passing directly overhead. QUESTION
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An observer on Earth's equator would find A. Polaris directly overhead. B. Polaris 40° above the northern horizon. C. Polaris on the Northern horizon. D. that the celestial equator passing directly overhead. QUESTION
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The ____ is the point on the celestial sphere directly above an observer who can be at any point on the Earth. A. north celestial pole B. south celestial pole C. zenith D. celestial equator E. nadir QUESTION
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Constellation names are from _____ translated into _______, the language of science in Europe until the 19th century. A. Greek; Latin B. Latin; Greek C. Latin; Arabic D. Greek; English E. Greek; Italian QUESTION
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Most star names, such as Aldebaran and Betelgeuse, are___ in origin. A. Latin B. Greek C. Arabic D. English E. Italian QUESTION
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The magnitude scale A. originated just after the telescope was invented. B. can be used to indicate the apparent intensity of a celestial object. C. was devised by Galileo. D. is no longer used today. E. was used to determine the rate of precession. QUESTION
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measure of the star's A. size. B. intensity. C. distance. D. color. E.
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ClassQ ch02 - QUESTION Seen from the northern latitudes...

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