Mood Commentary_HOD

Mood Commentary_HOD - M ood Commentary Going up that r iver...

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Mood Commentary Nick Cheng “Going up that river… for next day’s steaming.” Page 24-25 In this passage from “Heart of Darkness”, Joseph Conrad has successfully aroused various moods in the readers, ranging from melancholy and depression to alienation and isolation, by using imagery and diction through Marlow’s reflection on his journey “going up that river”. Conrad first sets the mood to anarchy and oppression by portraying “the earliest beginnings” to “when vegetation rioted”. “Rioted” has a negative connotation, giving a sense of unsettlement and disturbance to the readers. Then, he reflects on the journey as “an empty stream, a great silence, an impenetrable forest.” Conrad’s diction here clearly allows the readers to feel melancholy and depressed for the words “empty”, “silence” and “impenetrable” implies the emptiness and loneliness felt by Marlow in this journey. The gloomy mood of the passage is elaborated and emphasized in the next sentence when Conrad describes the air as “warm, thick, heavy, sluggish.” Conrad has cleverly used diction
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Mood Commentary_HOD - M ood Commentary Going up that r iver...

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