ENG225 Final Analyzing Film tutorial

ENG225 Final Analyzing Film tutorial - Analyzing Film...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Analyzing Film 1 Analyzing Film Laura Root English 225: Introduction to Film Matthew Norsworthy January 16, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Analyzing Film The lights are dim, sounds of crinkling candy wrappers can be heard, and the smell of popcorn is in the air. For the moment, the screen is the main attraction stretched across the theater, while the audience gets comfortable and waits in anticipation for the movie to begin. The theater turns to darkness, there is a blast of sound, and the screen comes to life. The movie begins and the audience is transported into a different realm for the next two hours. Analyzing a movie and breaking down the elements is an excellent way to learn the essentials of filmmaking and appreciate how the elements come together to guide the audience through the arc of the story. The elements will help the viewer to understand why some movies are considered classics and others just fade away after time. The theme in film analysis refers to the unification of the central concern of a film, with special focus that fuses together the work (Boggs & Petrie, 2008). The theme of a movie can share the same premise expressed differently. The theme can be found in the title of some movies, previews, critics, or when discussed with family and friends. Most likely, something in the movie stood out and had an effect on viewer. Interestingly, every now and then the theme is not prevalent throughout the movie and may not be recognized until the final scenes. Through analysis and focus of the elements working together as a whole, what seems to be obvious in the beginning may make the viewer reconsider at the end. An example of this type of theme would be The Sixth Sense (1999) , starring Haley Joel Osment and Bruce Willis. One of the early scenes in the movie, and quite humorous after knowing the twist at the end, the child played by Osment tells Bruce Willis that he sees dead people. This is a dead giveaway for the twist at the end; however, the film audience would not know this with the initial view. Universality is a commonly applied standard in evaluating a theme. A theme with universality is considered superior over a theme with a specific time and place. For example, movies that are released involving corruption, freedom, and war, are instances that happen in the world today; as well as 50 years ago. These themes speak loudly and are powerful because of the characters they portray and the struggles of humanity today. The theme or topic of a movie may be political or religious or both. Objectivity and subjectivity are important components to consider when deciding to view a film. The difference between these two ideas is the difference between fact and opinion. Facts are
Background image of page 2
objective and most likely true; however, depending on the story and the plot, and knowing the point of view being discussed, the opinions of the subjective person will be biased when reviewing the movie. Entering a movie objectively and analyzing the elements will give the audience greater pleasure and
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/17/2011 for the course ENGLISH 225 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at DeVry Austin.

Page1 / 9

ENG225 Final Analyzing Film tutorial - Analyzing Film...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online