Equine Diseases

Equine Diseases - Equine Diseases Equine Infectious Anemia...

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Unformatted text preview: Equine Diseases Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) No vaccination, no cure Similar to HIV in humans Highly contagious retrovirus Believed to be transmitted by horse flies, stable flies and mosquitoes Coggins test Agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) Checks for EIA antibodies in the blood What horse owners can do Use disposable syringes and needles. Follow the rule: one horse one needle. Clean and sterilize all instruments thoroughly after each use. Keep stables and immediate facilities clean and sanitary. Remove manure and debris promptly, and ensure that the area is well drained. Implement insect controls. The local veterinarian or animal health official can provide information about approved insecticides and other insect control measures. Avoid habitats favorable to insect survival. Do not intermingle infected and healthy animals. Do not breed EIAV-positive horses. Isolate all new horses, mules, and asses brought to the premises until they have been tested for EIA. Obtain the required certification of negative EIA test status for horse shows, county fairs, racetracks, and other places where many animals are brought together. Abide by State laws that govern EIA Strangles (Distemper, Barn Fever) Streptococcus Equi bacterial Infection Young horses in particular; or older/high stress horses highly contagious Swelling and infection of the throat region Fever of 102-106 F Depressed and unwilling to eat Nasal discharge may be serous or mucoid initially but quite purulent as the disease advances Affected animals usually cough Abscesses in the retropharyngeal or mandibular lymph nodes 10 - 14 d after the initial onset of signs Once ruptured contagious Swollen lymph glands that may burst Pus discharge from nostrils Strangles cont. Once on farm, persists Each crop can get it Mortality is low in uncomplicated cases Susceptible to penicillin Can make infection last longer by simply slowing down bacterial growth Similar to chickenpox in humans Once the disease clears, immune If active infection do not vaccinate If exposed but no fever/symptoms, can still vaccinate Strangles Cont. Vaccine exists Effectiveness limited Vaccination consists of a 2 - 3 shot series given at three week intervals Annual boosters are then recommended Can cause a lump or abscess at injection site Isolate horse and practice good hygiene Nasal spray is easy but $$$ Some farms allow it to spread to develop immunity in young stock Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis...
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2011 for the course AVS 100 taught by Professor Bolt during the Spring '11 term at Clemson.

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Equine Diseases - Equine Diseases Equine Infectious Anemia...

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