crouthamel male trauma

crouthamel male trauma - Male Sexuality and Psychological...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Male Sexuality and Psychological Trauma: Soldiers and Sexual Disorder in World War I and Weimar Germany Crouthamel, Jason. Journal of the History of Sexuality, Volume 17, Number 1, January 2008, pp. 60-84 (Article) Published by University of Texas Press DOI: 10.1353/sex.2008.0006 For additional information about this article Access Provided by Stony Brook University (SUNY) at 01/31/11 3:37AM GMT http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/sex/summary/v017/17.1crouthamel.html Journal of the History of Sexuality, Vol. 17, No. 1, January 2008 © 2008 by the University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, TX 78713-7819 60 Male Sexuality and Psychological Trauma: Soldiers and Sexual Disorder in World War I and Weimar Germany JASON CROUTHAMEL Grand Valley State University I N T H E H I S T O R Y O F T H E I N T E R S E C T I O N S between war, gender, and sexuality, historians have debated the degree to which the age of total war represented a step toward “remasculinization,” a process by which traditional constructions of masculinity are bolstered and strongly redefined as a reaction to a breakdown of hegemonic conceptions of masculinity. 1 In German society the First World War led to particularly intense debates over whether or not combat had been essentially healthy or destructive for the male psyche and body. On the brink of 1914 doctors and critics anticipated that the war would reinvigorate men weakened by decades of peace and the accelerated pace of modernity. The brutality and stress of modern warfare, however, seriously tested traditional gender norms and boundaries. 2 The postwar milieu was wrenched by cultural debates over the social effects of the war, intensified by the political divisions in the wake of defeat and revolution. Conflicts over the rise of the “new woman” and debates over the memory of the war as something either horrifying or laudable culminated with the 1 The contours of this debate are outlined by George L. Mosse, Nationalism and Sexuality: Respectability and Abnormal Sexuality in Modern Europe (New York: Howard Fertig, 1985); see also Sabine Kienitz, “Body Damage: War Disability and Constructions of Masculinity in Weimar Germany,” in Home/Front: The Military, War and Gender in Twentieth Century Germany , ed. Karen Hagemann and Stephanie Schüler-Springorum (Oxford: Berg, 2002), 181–204. For a definition of “remasculinization” in the context of post-1945 Germany see Robert Moeller, “The Remasculinization of Germany: An Introduction,” Signs 24 (1998): 101–5. 2 See Ute Frevert, Women in German History: From Bourgeois Emancipation to Sexual Lib- eration (Oxford: Berg, 1988), 168–70; for a classic study on the contrast between Weimar’s images of the “new woman” and the realities women faced see Renate Bridenthal and Claudia Koonz, “Beyond Kinder, Küche, Kirche,” in When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany , ed. Renate Bridenthal, Atina Grossman, and Marion Kaplan (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1984), 33–65. Soldiers and Sexual Disorder...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 26

crouthamel male trauma - Male Sexuality and Psychological...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online