Business & Ethics & Law A-7

Business & Ethics & Law A-7 - E thical and...

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Ethical and Legal 1 Running head: ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES WITH EMPLOYEE MONITORING Ethical and Legal Issues with Employee Monitoring Shranda Y. Caldwell Grand Canyon University Prof. Mestman July 13, 2010
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Ethical and Legal 2 Ethical and Legal Issues with Employee Monitoring Introduction Employee monitoring, due to the increase in cyber-loafing and lawsuits, has become more widespread and much easier with the use of new and cheaper technologies. Both employers and employees are concerned with the ethical implications of constant monitoring. While employers use monitoring devices to keep track of their employees’ actions and productivity, their employees feel that too much monitoring is an invasion of their privacy. Thus, the ethics of monitoring employees is explored and current practices are discussed. This paper will provide suggestions for reducing cyber-loafing and encourage institutions to create and effectively communicate ethical standards for employee monitoring in their firms. Ethics of Employee Monitoring Employee monitoring has emerged as a necessity and yet as a very controversial issue due to the complexity and widespread use of technology. Employee monitoring is defined as the act of watching and monitoring employees’ actions during working hours using employer equipment/property (www.huizenga.nova.edu). Employers are concerned with proper employee behavior and Code of Conduct compliance in relation to their industries and related organizations. While more and more employers are using monitoring devices to check or keep track of their employees’ actions, some employees feel that too much monitoring is an invasion of their privacy. While exceptional circumstances can be tolerated by the employers, they also feel that excess use of the Internet for non-job related activities while on the job can be destructive for their firm. The Orlando Sentinel (1999) stated that cost for employees surfing the Internet, during work hours using company equipment and time, in large industries could be as
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Business & Ethics & Law A-7 - E thical and...

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