Race and My Communit

Race and My Communit - Running head RACE AND MY COMMUNITY 1...

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Running head: RACE AND MY COMMUNITY 1 Race and My Community Amber Rouse ETH/125 February 20, 2011 Holly S. Antonelli
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RACE AND MY COMMUNITY 2 Race and My Community Growing up I was never so immersed in cultural diversity. My community was a white community. Until I was placed into a foster home and moved around the state to several different homes, towns, and schools. It wasn’t until I was 13 years old when I saw my first member of a different color. I remember growing up my mother always told me that I was no better than the person next to me. She taught me to not see color and to treat others how I wanted to be treated. When I was placed into a girls group home at the age of 16 is when I was able to see several different people of all different races and this was because the home was located more south and closer to Detroit Michigan. I truly appreciate that there were many peoples of different race, skin color, culture, religion, language, and ethnicity. All my experiences and opinions on cultural diversity are derived from my mother’s teachings and from living in an area that wasn’t limited to one race. For me it was like moving to another country. The culture shock was great. I knew that not everyone was the same but I had never lived among people who did not share my customs, culture, religion, skin color, or race before. In the United States the majority is White Americans; in my community the white population is 81.2%, Hispanic or Latino is 4.2%, African Americans 14.2%, and 0.6% American Indian. According to the US Census bureau’s 2009 poll Do members of your community look like you? In what ways do they look the same or different? There are some members of my community who look like me share my race, religion and culture; however there are those who do not. Some are different races and different skin tones. Most do not speak the same language as me. Still others do not have the same religious beliefs. I would say the majority of them do share my race, color, religion, or culture. Although even those that don’t still share the same things I do. For example they breathe, bleed, live and die just as I do. They have children, work, and have two arms, two legs, one head, and one heart just the same as I do, so one could say that the basic human qualities, which are most important, are the same for everyone. I asked my brother and mother in-law to answer these same questions I had to answer in a survey
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RACE AND MY COMMUNITY 3 form. In my brother’s response to this question he states: “Yes they look like me ‘cause they are Human, only difference is their skin color.” (Evan Mattison, personal communication Feb. 19, 2011). When asked the same question my mother in-laws response was: “Some do, some don’t. Some are
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2011 for the course PSY 230 taught by Professor ??? during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Race and My Communit - Running head RACE AND MY COMMUNITY 1...

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