lecture13+2_23_11_large

lecture13+2_23_11_large - LECTURE 13: Reproductive Health...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
LECTURE 13: Reproductive Health and Family Planning
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
•In many ways, reproductive health services can be analyzed using the conceptual frameworks (on the demand- and supply- side) that we have developed in class •But reproductive health and family planning have a long history that is somewhat distinct from the challenges of health improvement in developing countries •These lines are blurred today (reproductive health programs bundle services for family planning, maternal and child health, HIV and other STDs, etc.) •But early debate about “population policy” focused on rapid population growth, concerns about human populations outstripping food supply and other natural resources – and focused on population “control”
Background image of page 2
•As a budding global health expert, you should be aware of this history •Also, concern about measuring contraceptive use to know what areas should receive greater family planning resources spawned (no pun intended) the Demographic and Health Surveys (the wildly-successful younger sibling of the original World Fertility Surveys ) •Also, maternity-related deaths and morbidity can roughly be thought of as roughly proportionate to fertility rates (if each birth can crudely be considered an iid draw with some positive probability of death, etc) •Post-partum hemorrhage, sepsis, hypertensive disorders (eclampsia), complications of unsafe abortions, obstructed or prolonged labor
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
•Quote from Menken and Rahman chapter in “International Public Health” book listed as a reference on the syllabus: •“The major emphasis in the past few decades in low- and middle-income countries in reducing maternal morbidity and mortality has been decreasing the total number of pregnancies per woman.” •Less true today – emphasis on institutional delivery •In light of the quote above as well as ongoing debate about the importance of family planning programs and modern contraceptive supply in reducing fertility rates, our major question today: •How much can fertility rates really be influenced by public policy (and population policy/family planning in particular)?
Background image of page 4
Early population concern: The Population Bomb , Paul Ehrlich, 1968 “The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s and 1980s hundreds of millions of people will starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now. At this late date nothing can prevent a substantial increase in the world death rate. ..”
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Population Bomb (continued) •Malthusian doomsday scenario didn’t come true •Why? •Technological change/productivity growth: The Green Revolution
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 33

lecture13+2_23_11_large - LECTURE 13: Reproductive Health...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online