{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ACCT 301 Solutions to Chapter 11 Homework

ACCT 301 Solutions to Chapter 11 Homework - ACCT 301...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ACCT 301 Solutions to Chapter 11 Homework Question 11-2 The term depreciation often is confused with a decline in value or worth of an asset. Depreciation is not measured as decline in value from one period to the next. Instead, it involves the distribution of the cost of an asset, less any anticipated residual value, over the asset's estimated useful life in a systematic and rational manner that attempts to match revenues with the use of the asset. Question 11-4 Physical life provides the upper bound for service life. Physical life will vary according to the purpose for which the asset is acquired and the environment in which it is operated. Service life may be less than physical life for several reasons. For example, the expected rate of technological changes may shorten service life. Management intent also may shorten the period of an asset’s usefulness below its physical life. For instance, a company may have a policy of using its delivery trucks for a three-year period before trading the trucks for new models. Question 11-5 The total amount of depreciation to be recorded during an asset’s service life is called its depreciable base. This amount is the difference between the initial value of the asset at its acquisition (its cost) and its residual value. Residual or salvage value is the amount the company expects to receive for the asset at the end of its service life less any anticipated disposal costs. Question 11-8 Theoretically, the use of activity-based depreciation methods would provide a better matching of revenues and expenses. Clearly, the productivity of a plant asset is more closely associated with the benefits provided by that asset than the mere passage of time. However, activity-based methods quite often are either infeasible or too costly to use. For example, buildings do not have an identifiable measure of productivity. For assets such as machinery, there may be an identifiable measure of productivity, such as machine hours or units produced, but it is more costly to determine the amount each period than it is to simply measure the passage of time. For these reasons, most companies use time-based depreciation methods. Question 11-9 Companies might use the straight-line method because they consider that the benefits derived from the majority of plant assets are realized approximately evenly over these assets’ useful lives. It also is the easiest method to understand and apply. The effect on net income also could explain why so many companies prefer the straight-line method to the accelerated methods. Straight line produces a higher net income in the early years of an asset’s life.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern