Minerals-1 - Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny Ontogeny...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny y Phylogeny the evolutionary development of any plant or animal. y Ontogeny the life cycle of a single organism Rocks and minerals - grow from a single atom just as life grows from a single cell. Simplified Model of the Atom Atoms can be Combined Atoms can be Combined In metals, the metal atoms lose their outer electrons to form metal cations. The electrons from all the metal atoms form a "sea" of electrons that can flow around these metal cations. These electrons are often described as delocalised electrons delocalised means "not fixed in one place" or "free to move". http://jhss.wrdsb.on.ca/library/html/assignments/science/bond2.ht m Minerals versus Rocks Definitions y Rock = An aggregate of one or more minerals (granite, marble, or shale); or solid organic matter (coal). y Mineral = A natural occurring inorganic element or compound having an orderly internal structure and characteristic chemical composition, crystal form, and physical properties. y An amorphous compound such as opal would be a mineraloid. Just as Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny. So goes the Lithology. There are two major groups of rock forming minerals. y This statement asks two questions. y What are the questions? What minerals belong to each group? Nonsilicates y Any rock or mineral that does not have at least one Silicon and three Oxygen is a nonsilicate. y (SiO 3 ) Examples: NaCl Halite CaCO 3 Calcite Ca,Mg (CO 3 ) 2 Dolomite Ca 2 (Mg,Fe)4Al(Si 7 Al)O 22 (OH,F) 2 Hornblende Silicate Group y Make up 75% of the Crustal Rocks y Fundamental Unit is Silica Oxygen Tetrahedron y SiO 4 y Can be Arranged to Form Different Structures y (Mg,Fe) 2 SiO 4 Olivine y Al(Al,Si) 3 O 8 Feldspar Silicon Oxygen Tetrahedron Common Silicates and their internal form Seven Rock Forming Minerals y Quartz y Feldspar y Mica y Amphibole y Pyroxene y Olivine y Clay Minerals Quartz SiO 2 Silica Dioxide SiO 2 The following minerals also...
View Full Document

Page1 / 86

Minerals-1 - Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny Ontogeny...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online