in class note - CHM 115 Lecture 26 Todays Lecture Reading...

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1 1 CHM 115 Lecture 26 Today’s Lecture Reading was KTT: Sections 13.1, 13.2, 13.4 Solids Types of Solids Amorphous solids Crystalline solids Unit Cells Next Lecture Read Inter-chapter: The Chemistry of Modern Materials Pages 656-669
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2 Amorphous Solids Tar, molten glass, molten plastics, and molten butter, consist of large molecules or a mixture of molecules that cannot move readily. As the temperature is lowered, their molecules move more and more slowly and finally stop in random positions. The resulting materials are called amorphous solids or glasses. Such solids lack an ordered internal structure . Common examples include candle wax, butter, glass, and plastics.
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3 Snow See www.snowcrystals.com for more.
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4 Crystalline Solids When most liquids are cooled, they eventually freeze and form crystalline solids , solids in which the atoms, ions, or molecules are arranged in a definite repeating pattern .
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5 Crystalline Solids Some solids (such as diamonds and the individual grains in sugar and table salt) are single crystal. Most common crystalline solids are aggregates of many small crystals. Common examples of the latter are sandstone, chunks of ice, granite, and metal objects.
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6 Major Types of Crystalline Solids - Reading Interparticle Forces Physical Behavior Atomic (Noble gases) Molecular Ionic Metallic Network Soft, very low mp, poor thermal & electrical conductors Dispersion Dispersion, dipole-dipole, H bonds Fairly soft, low to moderate mp, poor thermal & electrical conductors Covalent bond Metallic bond Ion-ion attraction Very hard, very high mp, usually poor thermal and electrical conductors Soft to hard, low to very
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2011 for the course CHEM 115 taught by Professor L during the Fall '02 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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in class note - CHM 115 Lecture 26 Todays Lecture Reading...

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