Lecture Notes

Lecture Notes - Sustainable Environments 7 February 2011...

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Sustainable Environments 7 February 2011 Case Study: Black and white and spread all over Small, black and white shellfish Introduced to Lake St. Clair, Canada, in 1988, in discharged ballast water Within 2 years, the zebra mussels invaded all 5 Great Lakes Populations grew exponentially No Natural predators, competitors, or parasites Hundreds of millions of dollars of damage to property Invasive species Invasive species = non-native (exotic) organisms that spread widely and become dominant in a community Growth-limiting factors (predators, disease, etc.) They have major ecological effects Some species help people (i.e., European honeybee) Effects of zebra mussels and other invasive species Zebra mussels eat phytoplankton and zooplankton Both populations decrease in lakes with zebra mussels They don't eat cyanobacteria Population increase in lakes with zebra mussels Burmese Python – an invasive causing havoc in the Florida everglades – No natural predators Species interactions Species interactions are the backbone of communities Most important categories
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2011 for the course GUS 0842 taught by Professor Neimark during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

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Lecture Notes - Sustainable Environments 7 February 2011...

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