285%2Bchap02-ct-1

285%2Bchap02-ct-1 - Statistics Chapter 2 Methods for...

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Chap 2-1 Statistics Chapter 2 Methods for Describing Sets of Data Part 1
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Chap 2-2 Data
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Chap 2-3 Data Types Data Qualitative (Categorical) Quantitative (Numerical) Discrete Continuous Examples: Marital Status Political Party Eye Color (Defined categories) Examples: Number of Children Defects per hour (Counted items) Examples: Weight Voltage (Measured characteristics)
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Chap 2-4 Data Types Time Series Data Ordered data values observed over time Cross Section Data Data values observed at a fixed point in time
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Chap 2-5 Data Types Sales (in $1000’s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 Atlanta 435 460 475 490 Boston 320 345 375 395 Cleveland 405 390 410 395 Denver 260 270 285 280 Time Series Data Cross Section Data
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Chap 2-6 Data Measurement Levels Ratio/Interval Data Ordinal Data Nominal Data Highest Level Complete Analysis Higher Level Mid-level Analysis Lowest Level Basic Analysis Categorical Codes ID Numbers Category Names Rankings Ordered Categories Measurements
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Chap 2-7 Table 2.1 & Table 2.2
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Chap 2-8 Table 2.3
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Chap 2-9 Definition 2.3
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Chap 2-10 Table 2.4
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Chap 2-11 Table 2.9
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Chap 2-12 Frequency Distributions What is a Frequency Distribution? A frequency distribution is a list or a table containing the values of a variable (or a set of ranges within which the data fall) . .. and the corresponding frequencies with which each value occurs (or frequencies with which data fall within each range)
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Chap 2-13 Why Use Frequency Distributions? A frequency distribution is a way to summarize data The distribution condenses the raw data into a more useful form. .. and allows for a quick visual interpretation of the data
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Chap 2-14 Frequency Distribution: Discrete Data Discrete data: possible values are countable Example: An advertiser asks 200 customers how many days per week they read the daily newspaper. Number of days read Frequency 0 44 1 24 2 18 3 16 4 20 5 22 6 26 7 30 Total 200
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Chap 2-15 Relative Frequency Relative Frequency : What proportion is in each category? Number of days read Frequency Relative Frequency 0 44 .22 1 24 .12 2 18 .09 3 16 .08 4 20 .10 5 22 .11 6 26 .13 7 30 .15 Total 200 1.00 .22 200 44 = 22% of the people in the sample report that they read the newspaper 0 days per week
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Chap 2-16 Frequency Distribution: Continuous Data Continuous Data: may take on any value in some interval Example: A manufacturer of insulation randomly selects 20 winter days and records the daily high temperature 24, 35, 17, 21, 24, 37, 26, 46, 58, 30, 32, 13, 12, 38, 41, 43, 44, 27, 53, 27 (Temperature is a continuous variable because it could be measured to any degree of precision desired)
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Grouping Data by Classes Sort raw data from low to high: 12, 13, 17, 21, 24, 24, 26, 27, 27, 30, 32, 35, 37, 38, 41, 43, 44, 46, 53, 58 Find range: 58 - 12 = 46 Select number of classes: 5 (usually between 5 and 20) Compute class width: 10 (46/5 then round off) Determine class boundaries: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2011 for the course STATS 100 taught by Professor Lawerence during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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285%2Bchap02-ct-1 - Statistics Chapter 2 Methods for...

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