multiplexing_basic

multiplexing_basic - Data Communications and Computer...

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1 Chapter 5 Multiplexing : Sharing a Medium Data Communications and Computer Networks: A Business User’s Approach
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2 Data Communications and Computer Networks Chapter 5 Last time Making connections Synchronous vs asynchronous (temporal) Duplex vs simplex (directional) Continue making connections – multiplexing Many into one; one into many (spatial) Will use time and frequency to do it.
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3 Introduction Under the simplest conditions, a medium can carry only one signal at any moment in time. For multiple signals to share one medium, the medium must somehow be divided, giving each signal a portion of the total bandwidth. The current techniques that can accomplish this include frequency division multiplexing (FDM) time division multiplexing (TDM) Synchronous vs statistical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) code division multiplexing (CDM)
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4 Multiplexing Multiplexor (MUX) Demultiplexor (DEMUX) Sometimes just called a MUX
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5 Multiplexing Two or more simultaneous transmissions on a single circuit. Transparent to end user. Multiplexing costs less .
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6 Data Communications and Computer Networks Chapter 5 Frequency Division Multiplexing Assignment of non-overlapping frequency ranges to each “user” or signal on a medium. Thus, all signals are transmitted at the same time, each using different frequencies. A multiplexor accepts inputs and assigns frequencies to each device. The multiplexor is attached to a high-speed communications line. A corresponding multiplexor, or demultiplexor, is on the end of the high-speed line and separates the multiplexed signals.
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7 Data Communications and Computer Networks Chapter 5
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Data Communications and Computer Networks Chapter 5 Frequency Division Multiplexing Analog signaling is used to transmits the signals. Broadcast radio and television, cable television, and the AMPS cellular phone systems use frequency division multiplexing. This technique is the oldest multiplexing technique.
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multiplexing_basic - Data Communications and Computer...

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