Chap 7 Questions

Chap 7 Questions - Sarah Edwards Mr. LaRock OCS 1005 26...

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Sarah Edwards Mr. LaRock OCS 1005 26 February 2008 1. Q: How are the chemical methods of determining salinity dependent on the principle of constant proportions? A: The principle of constant proportions states that even though the total amount of dissolved solids varies with different seawater samples, the ratio of salts in seawater from different areas (even those with very high or very low salinity) remain the same in different samples. For example, seawater from different locations with different salinities will be made up of 55.04% chloride ions in both samples. Where the water comes from makes no difference. The chloride ion is easy to measure as a concentrate to find water’s salinity. The chlorinity of water, or the number of the total mass of halogen ions, is calculated using the following formulas: salinity in 0 / 00 = 1.80655 x chlorinity in 0 / 00 . Since the average chlorinity is around 19.2% the typical salinity is about 34.7%. 2. Q: How are seawater’s conservative constituents different from its nonconservative
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Chap 7 Questions - Sarah Edwards Mr. LaRock OCS 1005 26...

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