SocStud-SouthLetter

SocStud-SouthLetter - noticed only the wealthier actually...

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Dear Mom and Dad, How’ve you guys been? I miss you all so much. I am staying with Aunt Carolyn on the Thomason Plantation. Tonight I am attending a dance with the Walsh’s son as my escort. Remember how we used to play together all the time as children? Oh, how much we’ve grown since then! The weather here is very warm, even for summer, and I hear it is mild during the winters. Also, it rains quite often. The land is beautiful and is great for farming. The soil is rich and the rivers slow. I’ve already gone swimming. I just adore it here. There are lots of small towns here and there are few large cities. I know this seems rural but it’s actually quite quaint. Everyone is very family centered and extremely welcoming. It seems that the large plantations owners rule society so the Thomason’s and Walsh’s are well known. Everyone seems traditional and laid-back, the complete opposite of how home is. The plantations and small farms seem very self- sufficient and profitable, and even though it seems as if everyone supports slavery, I
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Unformatted text preview: noticed only the wealthier actually own any. The slaves are pretty friendly considering their poor living conditions. The economy here is mostly agrarian with lack of industry and capital. The main crops here are tobacco, rice, sugar, indigo, and of course, cotton. Indigo is this neat plant that they use to dye fabrics blue. It seems very fascinating. There is a device here known as the cotton gin and it has increased the production of cotton, so Ive been told. The transportation here is based mainly on waterways such as canals and ships. Most of the cotton is shipped through boats and steamships. There are also a some railroads, sot nearly as much as there are at home. As for human transportation, there are canals, carriages, trains, and o course, walking. I miss you all and send my love. See you at the end of the summer! Take care and write back soon! Love Always, Your Daughter, Destiny Sze [D]...
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2011 for the course DAS 152 taught by Professor Powers during the Spring '11 term at Moorpark College.

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SocStud-SouthLetter - noticed only the wealthier actually...

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