PHYS Lab #10

PHYS Lab #10 - ½ MR^2 M is the mass of the disk and R is...

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David Thibodeaux PHYS 111A Lab 127: Torque, Inertia, and Rotational Kinetic Energy 11/19/2010 Objectives: Part I: to determine the rotational inertia of rotating bodies I by measuring their angular acceleration a and to compare this measurement with the rotational inertia computed from physical measurements. Part II: To compute the energy loss of the system and compare the mechanical energy of the system at two points in time. Theory: We start with the equations: t = Fr 1 I = mr 2 t net = I α Using Newton’s second Law: F = ma we can make the following substitutions: mg – T = ma m = T/(g-a) m = T/(g - r) α and finally: I = Tr 2 /(g – r) α
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Using this equation we can calculate the inertia of the system. Part II: Experiment Using the calculations, we can determine the expected inertia of a rotating system, and using the LABPro Interface, we can observe the actual inertia of the system. Procedure: 1. Take the physical measurements of the disk and, using the following formula compute the rotational inerta of the disk: I =
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Unformatted text preview: ½ MR^2. M is the mass of the disk and R is the radius of the disk. Measurements: Disk 1: 1353 g Disk 2: 469 g Pulley mass: 90 g Radius: 8 cm 2. The bottom steel disk will be stationary on the base plate; the top steel disk will “float” on the lower one. The torque is applied by the hanging mass, and using the LabPro interface, we will calculate the inertia of the system. 3. Plug the phone jack with the yellow band into Port 1 of the ULI. 4. After opening the air supply, begin collecting data after releasing the weight, allowing the disk to spin freely. 5. Analyze data. Data analysis: Using the previous calculations, the calculated inertia of the disk and the actual inertias were found… Calc. Inertia Actual Inertia Percent Error Disk 1 4.3296 kg m 2 4.5610 kg m 2 5.0% Disk 2 1.5008 kg m 2 1.6531 kg m 2 9.2% Conclusion: Using derived calculations, we can determine the expected inertia of a uniform-mass cylindrical object with relatively low error....
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2011 for the course BME 111 taught by Professor Gokce during the Spring '11 term at NJIT.

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PHYS Lab #10 - ½ MR^2 M is the mass of the disk and R is...

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