anxiety disorders 2 - Intro to Psychology 2 Lecture 3...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Intro to Psychology 2 Lecture 3 Anxiety Disorders Dr Nicola McGuigan DB2.59 [email protected]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Anxiety is a thin stream of fear  trickling through the mind.  If  encouraged, it cuts a channel into  which all other thoughts are drained.    Arthur Somers Roche
Background image of page 2
Anxiety Mood state Negative affect Bodily symptoms of tension Apprehension about the future Natural experience Good in small amounts – can improve performance
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Too much anxiety? Too tense Fail in anxiety-provoking situations (e.g. exam, driving test) Can’t overcome even when you know there is no reason to be afraid.
Background image of page 4
Lecture overview Anxiety disorders Generalized anxiety disorder Panic disorder Phobias Obsessive compulsive disorder Treatments for anxiety disorders Pharmacological Psychological
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Generalized anxiety disorder DSM-IV-TR characterizes Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) as: Generalized anxiety over at least 6 months Worry difficult to control 3 or more of: restlessness, easily fatigued, concentration problems,  irritability, muscle tension, sleep disturbance Sufferers are anxious about minor, trivial things but this worry is  persistent. Work, study, health, finances or family issues. Tends to be a chronic disorder, although sufferers don’t often  seek treatment
Background image of page 6
Theories of GAD (i) Biological approaches Greater prevalence of GAD in the relatives of GAD sufferers Twin studies have found 15-20% concordance rates Possible role for GABA? GABA inhibits neural responses  triggered by fear (stops your fear).
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cognitive-behavioural explanations Beck:  Due to misinterpretation of relatively benign situations  (crossing the road) as very threatening, because of  distorted cognitive processing.  Some evidence for this – GAD patients more sensitive  to threatening stimuli (physical harm, social  misfortune), people looking away. Ambiguous events interpreted as threatening, ominous 
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/23/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 101 taught by Professor North during the Spring '11 term at Heriot-Watt.

Page1 / 32

anxiety disorders 2 - Intro to Psychology 2 Lecture 3...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online