Greco-Roman Religions and Philosophies

Greco-Roman Religions and Philosophies - I ngrid Shih REL...

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Ingrid Shih REL 1310-31 21 October 2010 Greco-Roman Religions and Philosophies 1. Preamble: The Underlying Platonic Cosmology: Allegory of the Cave a. Plato imagines a group of people who have lived chained in a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them, and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows. According to Plato, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to seeing reality. He then explains how the philosopher is like a prisoner who is freed from the cave and comes to understand that the shadows on the wall are not constitutive of reality at all, as he can perceive the true form of reality rather than the mere shadows seen by the prisoners. b. Cosmology: A view of the world c. The Allegory is related to Plato's Theory of Forms wherein Plato asserts that "Forms" (or "Ideas"), and not the material world of change known to us through sensation, possess the highest and most fundamental kind of reality. Only knowledge of the Forms
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2011 for the course REL 1310 taught by Professor Holleyman during the Fall '08 term at Baylor.

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Greco-Roman Religions and Philosophies - I ngrid Shih REL...

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