Scalable Peer–to–Peer Process Management — The OSIRIS Approach

Scalable Peer–to–Peer Process Management — The OSIRIS Approach

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Unformatted text preview: Scalable PeertoPeer Process Management The OSIRIS Approach Christoph Schuler 1 Roger Weber 1 Heiko Schuldt 2 Hans-J. Schek 1 , 2 1 Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), CH8092 Zurich, 2 University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics, and Technology (UMIT), A-6020 Innsbruck, E-mail: { schuler,weber,schek } @inf.ethz.ch, heiko.schuldt@umit.at In: Proceedings of the 2 nd International Conference on Web Services (ICWS2004), pages 26-34, San Diego, CA, USA, June 2004. Abstract The functionality of applications is increasingly being made available by services. General concepts and stan- dards like SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI support the discov- ery and invocation of single web services. Stateofthe art process management is conceptually based on a cen- tralized process manager. The resources of this coordina- tor limit the number of concurrent process executions, es- pecially since the coordinator has to persistently store each state change for recovery purposes. In this paper, we over- come this limitation by executing processes in a peer-to- peer way exploiting all nodes of the system. By distributing the execution and navigation costs, we can achieve a higher degree of scalability allowing for a much larger through- put of processes compared to centralized solutions. This pa- pers describes our prototype system OSIRIS , which imple- ments such a true peertopeer process execution. We fur- ther present very promising results verifying the advantages over centralized process management in terms of scalabil- ity. 1. Introduction In the last years, information technology has undergone several major changes. Especially the current trend towards service-orientation, i.e., dedicated services that allow to ac- cess data and/or applications, had a strong impact of infor- mation systems and middleware and has radically changed the way information processing takes place. In particular, web services that can be invoked by common web proto- cols (SOAP over HTTP) have led to the recent proliferation of service-oriented computing. System support for the invo- cation of single web services is widely available. However, one of the most important tasks when dealing with web ser- vices is to combine existing services into a coherent whole. Such applications spanning several (web) service invoca- tions are usually realized by processes . The platform inde- pendent definitions like XML, SOAP, and WSDL further simplify such a composition.In many application scenarios, we can use processes for maintenance purposes to imple- ment replication or to enforce consistency constraints over different sources. This is done by automatically triggering the execution of a process whenever the violation of a con- straint has occurred. Furthermore, it is also natural for such systems to implement accesses to data and queries from users by processes that gather the information via differ- ent service calls and aggregate the retrieved data according to the users demand. As a result, the infrastructure of suchto the users demand....
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2011 for the course COMPUTER S DIT09M1-10 taught by Professor Saman during the Spring '10 term at Sheffield Hallam.

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Scalable Peer–to–Peer Process Management — The OSIRIS Approach

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