ENG_121_Profile_Draft - Taiwo 1 Trinity Taiwo Ms Harris...

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Taiwo 1 Trinity Taiwo Ms. Harris English 121 17 September 2019 The I-Word This is from a daughter who has an immigrant father, who has no other life outside of the confines of America. I have been assimilated into thinking I’m just American; I have endured hatred for myself in such a way that has shaped me to resent my heritage. My father on the other hand, has seen the beauty of being a man from the Yoruba tribe with a tribal mark evenly placed on his nose; who vibrantly speaks Yoruba, and English. My father’s name is Adesoji Taiwo who is an immigrant from Lagos, Nigeria, who was raised in London, England. Twenty-eight years ago he decided to make the biggest adjustment to his life— migrating to America, who knew this would be a journey of many lessons, and representation through different political climates. My father states he first came across his interest of America from the interest of business opportunities, he found out business opportunities from the response of an ad which he saw in London. A man from California wanted to teach him how to trade in sale commodities. According to Dinah Wisenberg Brin in the article Immigrants Form 25% of New U.S. Businesses, Driving Entrepreneurship In 'Gateway' States claims, “Immigrants account for more than 40 percent of new businesses in California, New York and New Jersey and fewer than 5 percent in Idaho, North Dakota and some other places,” Many people believe the common conception about immigrants coming to steal American jobs, however people like my father and many other immigrants travel across the world to create businesses to enhance America. The development in more businesses can make America stronger, but in order for this to happen we
Taiwo 2 need to be accepting for more people of different ethnicities, religions who came here for a higher quality of life by helping them adapt to an American lifestyle in a welcoming way. Many people struggle with adapting to American culture, it’s like your first day of school; sometimes you’re excited or sometimes you’re scared because you don’t know if people will like you for who you are. Some people bully you for how you look or talk, however this wasn’t the case for my father. When I asked my father how was he able to adapt to American culture he

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