Burger King Queuing Modeling and Improvements

Burger King Queuing Modeling and Improvements - Burger King...

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Burger King Queuing Modeling and Improvements 540:338 Probabilistic Models in OR Authors: Robert Kosaka Warren Lam Chris Lui Zachary Shands Lizbeth Zuniga Due Date: December 15, 2009
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Executive Summary The problem studied in this project is the arrival process of customers as they enter the drive-thru of a Burger King. This arrival process is unaffected by the number of customers present. The service process of the queuing system at Burger King’s drive thru are in parallel because all servers provide the same type of service and a customer need only pass through one window to complete service. The customer technically passes through two servers, one being the order taker and the order being the pick-up window. In this case we are only analyzing the window time being that it is the only station that is not to corporate standards. The queuing discipline used in this system is the FCFS (first come first serve) discipline, in which customers are served in the order of their arrival. To model this arrival and service process we use an M/M/1 queuing system which has an exponential interarrival times and a single server with exponential service times. By using this queuing system we are able to analyze and evaluate Burger King’s drive thru and propose improvements. From the time data we collected from sensors placed throughout the service process we can find three important values used to evaluate if the system is running efficiently to Burger King’s standards. The three values are W, Wq, and Ws. W is the average time a customer spends in the drive thru all together, Wq is the average time a customer spends in line waiting to initially be helped (queued), and Ws is the average time the customer spends in service. All averages are steady-state averages. In this case Burger King’s standards are 2 minutes and 30 seconds for Ws.
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Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction The Burger King that we analyzed is located in Hopelawn, New Jersey. It is an area in which the business is always busy especially during lunch and dinner hours on a
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Sunday. It is a business in which speed and quality are very important. There is a requirement of 30 seconds are allowed for paying and pickup of the food. This has yet to be accomplished. The total time of 2 minutes and 30 seconds is accomplished. We are assuming that for this system if the line is too long the customer leaves. The times where taken by sensors that allow the computer to take the appropriate times in each section of the process. This allows for an accurate report to be created. The report contained all the information for a full business day but, we decided to use only the lunch and dinner times because it a constant flow during those hours. The report contains the amount of customers who entered the Queue System. This information allows for us to analyze the system and suggest improvements that could be made to improve and reach the goal of a window time of 30 seconds. System Description
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2011 for the course INDUSTRIAL 540 taught by Professor Albin during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Burger King Queuing Modeling and Improvements - Burger King...

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