IHSpring10 Mosaic951002Jih

IHSpring10 Mosaic951002Jih - TEMPLE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF...

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TEMPLE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF LIBERALS ARTS SPRING 2010 INTELLECTUAL HERITAGE 048738 0951 002 HONOR MOSAIC: HUMANITIES SEMINAR I INSTRUCTOR: LUKE [CHANG-SHIN] JIH Ph.D. Class Scheduled: 10:00 -10:50 AM, Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays Classroom: Gladfelter Hall # 741 Office: HB 213D, Anderson Hall, Main Campus (2 nd floor, across from the elevator) Office Hours: Mon. 3:00- 5:00 PM, Wed. 12:00-1:00 PM or by Appointment Contact Information: Tel: 215-204-7893; Email: [email protected] COURSE OVERVIEW AND GOALS Mosaic Humanities Seminar I is the first half of a year-long course designed to introduce students to some of the fundamental concepts of human civilization. Through the use of primary texts spanning the last 4000 years students will gain a better understanding of key ideas and values of people in the past and how these have come to shape the world we all now share. The first semester explores themes of self and community and might be thought of as having the overall themes of “People in Groups” or “Who am I and what do I share with the rest of humanity.” We will explore primary texts from a variety of traditions in an effort to help you reach these goals or improve your skills. Mosaic I is designed to help you be successful in Mosaic II, the other GenEd courses you are taking and will take, and the courses that make up your major. These texts will be studied as windows into the worlds of their individual creators. Each will be examined for its major themes and expressive content. Study of these diverse texts will also be used as means to help us understand aspects of the various cultures which produced them, and the relevance of these works to contemporary cultures. Our goal is to grasp both the statement being made by the writer as well as the significance of the work to contemporary and later audiences. This will be accomplished through an understanding of both content (what the author is saying) and form or style (how he or she is saying it). Your goals for the course are to become both better readers and better writers. You will be able to analyze the texts in order that you understand both content and form, to read the texts critically so that the insights contained in them become clear to you, and to synthesize those ideas into a fresh statement that tells me that you truly grasp the significance of the works, in both their historical context and in your world today. You must be able to clearly express your ideas about the texts both verbally during class discussion and in writing, both on homework and in formal papers. And along the way you will gain a better understanding of the shape, content, and chronology of World Intellectual Tradition and a few of the people who played a role in shaping it. 1
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COURSE OBJECTIVES The Intellectual Heritage Program, which runs the Mosaic courses, has indentified five main things that students should be able to do, or to do better, by the time they complete both Mosaic classes. These competencies are officially stated like this: By the end of Mosaic II, students should be able to: 1. Read in its entirety an unfamiliar and problematic written text (theoretically, historically, or
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