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EXAM 2 Minerals - Exam grades are posted on sakai Planet...

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Exam grades are posted on sakai
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Planet Earth: The Wonderful World of Minerals
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What is a Mineral? “A naturally occurring inorganic solid with a regular internal atomic structure and a specific chemical composition.” MUST obey certain conditions! © Jay Schomer
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What is a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 2. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 2. Definite chemical composition 3. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) A mineraloid exhibits some, but not all, properties Doesn’t include “minerals” in the nutritional sense © Jay Schomer
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What is a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 1. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 2. Definite chemical composition 3. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) © Jay Schomer
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Augite 1. Naturally occurring – From nature not formed in the laboratory
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What’s a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 1. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 2. Definite chemical composition 3. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) © Jay Schomer
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Must be a single solid phase that maintains it’s shape indefinitely and does not conform to shape of container. Ice is a mineral Water is not Water vapor is not Water simply has a Water simply has a lower melting lower melting point than quartz! point than quartz! What is a Mineral?
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Magma Rock (composed of minerals)
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What is a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 2. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 1. Definite chemical composition 2. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) © Jay Schomer
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Cannot have organic compounds (carbon bonded to H, O, N, or other elements) e.g. coal is not a mineral as it results from decaying organic matter. What is a Mineral?
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Organic vs. Inorganic Organic compounds are molecules of Carbon (C) bonded with Hydrogen (H) and Oxygen (O) and/or Nitrogen (N) Occur in living organisms Plastics, sugars, fat, protein Carbon bound to carbon ONLY (e.g. diamonds) Carbon bound to Oxygen ONLY (e.g. carbonate)
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Biotic vs. Abiotic Biotic: formed via biological activity, regardless of chemical composition Some inorganic materials can form through biologic processes Inorganic calcite (CaCO 3 ) in shells, formed by life activity of organism
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What is a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 2. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 1. Definite chemical composition 1. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) © Jay Schomer
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What is a Mineral? A fixed ratio of elements - mineral is a chemical compound with a specific chemical formula . Olivine – (Fe,Mg) 2 SiO 4
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What’s a Mineral? 1. Naturally occurring 2. Solid 1. Inorganic, formed geologically 2. Definite chemical composition 1. Ordered atomic arrangement (crystalline structure) © Jay Schomer
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Crystalline Structure Atoms in a mineral are specifically ordered.
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