Voltaire - Voltaires Candide Through the use of satire,...

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Voltaire´s Candide Through the use of satire, Voltaire paints a poignant picture of the world as he sees it. He deftly promulgates principles of the Enlightenment by subtly mocking what he sees as outdated and counterproductive. There are several notable examples of this in his work entitled Candide . Most specifically, Voltaire targets organizations such as religions and governments that are oppressive; he also belittles ideas and philosophies of his day that were not conducive towards progression. Voltaire belays his personal belief of a free exchange of ideas and his disdain for censorship and ignorance through clever, barbed satire that is transmitted through the character Candide and the circumstances that surround him. The story opens on a young boy, Candide. He is tutored to believe that the world around him is best of all possible worlds by his teacher, Master Pangloss, who is a student of “metaphysico-theologo-cosmolo-nigolody”. Due to the absurdity of the name of Pangloss´ field of study, the reader can clearly see that Voltaire is at direct odds with the belief of a naturally
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Voltaire - Voltaires Candide Through the use of satire,...

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