03 Earliest Watercraft - The Earliest Watercraft The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Earliest Watercraft The earliest inhabitants of America migrated across the Bering Straits beginning around 22,000 BP. 12,000 BP in the book Boat important form of transportation Monte Verde, Chile, 12, 000 BC There are actually 4 possible routes EUROPEAN ROUTE KENNEWICK MAN 9,200 BP NATIVE AMERICAN OR EUROPEAN A possible population of 45 million by 1492, the year Christopher Columbus arrived in America. In 1500 very diverse populations. No iron or steel technology. The Europeans incorrectly called all these groups "Indians." Columbus thought he was in India. Did not use the wheel for transportation. Rivers, lakes, and seas were their highways Made craft from materials available in each area they populated. As always, each of their watercraft was just one possible solution for a given problem: to transport people and goods over water. Some of these boats were so good that they are still in use today. The environment dictated needs, and provided natural resources for tools and building materials. North America Eskimos occupied the land from the Bering Strait to Greenland before the arrival of the first Europeans. In Alaska, evidence of whaling from around 2,000 BC Eskimos have developed many regional styles of boats. However, they all have built two main types of craft: kayaks and umiaks. Skin boats built over a pre-erected wooden skeleton, generally paddled, and known to the Eskimos for at least 1500 years (toy or models). Kayaks are built over a lashed structure, usually of driftwood with a skin cover (from seal or walrus) oiled with animal fat. The kayak was for hunting and fishing. The gunwale provides most of its strength The light frames support the skin cover. The kayak is fully watertight Occupant laces his own clothing to the rim of the manhole Should it capsize the Eskimo can right the boat with a stroke of his paddle. The umiak is larger and heavier boat.The umiak is larger and heavier boat....
View Full Document

Page1 / 66

03 Earliest Watercraft - The Earliest Watercraft The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online