Nautical Terms in Use - Nautical language is a funny one....

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Nautical language is a funny one. Every sail has a head and a foot They all have a clew But only the keel can have a shoe And the keel and keelson can have a scarph The stem can have a gripe, but don’t come to loggerheads Sails have sheets, but only Masts have shrouds and They have nothing to do with the Captain’s coffin. There is a buttock in the stern and all hulls have buttock lines There are several crotches on top of the deadwood A ship can have a ceiling, but it’s attached to the floors It can have more knees than a centipede There is a menagerie on board including: alligators (in the varnish) BEARings (in the engine room) beetle mallet (tool) bumblebee (yellow and black mooring line) bull's eyes Bul[l]wark butterfly valve (engine room) Cardinal Point (on compass) cat, cathead, catblock cow hitches crane lines crows nest (not on Elissa) dog (thing that connects jackstay to the yard) Dogs (latch on deadlihgt) dog rail dolphin striker Donkey Engine donkey room "Drum" head (top of the capstan) Duck (cloth, finer than canvass; used for small sails) Duck Tape Fish (piece of wood fastened lengthwise on another to strengthen it; as, To fish the mast) Fish Tackle, fish hook, fish davit, fished anchor Fluke (of the anchor) goosenecks (on the boom and the gaff) goosewing (we can goosewing the sails ) hog (in the keel) horse, flemish horse horsing mallet (tool)
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horsing iron (tool) hoss pipe (homonym for hawse pipe) Hounds leaches (of a sail) lizards marlin spike monkey rail Monkey Fist mouse, mousings nighthawk which is attached to a pig stick pig stick ratlines reef (animals, technically) seals (engine room and elsewhere) spider band swallow in a block turk's heads for mice on headrig footropes wildcat - on windlass worm gear worming in the service There is both the head of a cat and a knight and there is a rabbet on the keel All at sea That sinking feeling Son of a gun Mainstay of society Slacker Til the Bitter end To toe the line (not tow the line) The devil to pay (and no pitch hot) You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours Originally meant "Hey Tom, you take it easy with the cat on my back I'll go easy when its your turn." to scratch ment not to lash out hard but go easy the cat was the "cat-o-nine" tails used to dish out punishment 12 lashes through ----- Don’t let the cat out of the bag. Cat o nine tails kept in a bag, when the cat was taken out, someone was being punished. Came to mean don’t tell a secret. To Know the Ropes - There was miles and miles of cordage in the rigging of a square rigged ship. The only way of keeping track of and knowing the function of all of
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these lines was to know where they were located. It took an experienced seaman to know the ropes . Dressing Down - Thin and worn sails were often treated with oil or wax to renew their
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Nautical Terms in Use - Nautical language is a funny one....

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