Piracy - Piracy No stopping them For all the efforts to...

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Piracy No stopping them For all the efforts to combat it, Somali piracy is posing an ever greater threat to the world’s shipping Feb 3rd 2011 | from the print edition Correction to this article THE first successful pirate attack of 2011 could scarcely have come more promptly. In the early afternoon of January 1st, monitors at the Maritime Security Centre-Horn of Africa, based in Northwood near London, picked up distress signals from the MV Blida . Somali pirates had hijacked the Greek-operated, Algerian-flagged 20,586-tonne bulk carrier, its crew of 27 (mainly Algerian and Ukrainian) and its cargo of clinker. The ship was some 150 nautical miles south-east of the Omani port of Salalah and heading for Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. Four days later the Blida ’s Ukrainian captain sent word that the ship was berthed off the Somali coast near the pirate lair of Garacad. The crew, he said, was safe and unharmed but the pirates had yet to start haggling with the owners over the ransom. Related topics Kidnapping
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Crime and law Crime Indian Ocean Tanzania The Northwood centre was established in late 2008 as part of Operation Atalanta, a European Union (EU) naval initiative against Somali piracy. It works with the Royal Navy’s UK Maritime Trade Operations office in Dubai as a reporting hub for pirate activity and as a communications hub for the multinational naval forces in the area. The seizure of the Blida was the fourth attack on New Year’s Day; the other three were unsuccessful, thanks to evasive action and other protective measures. Since then attacks have been running at the rate of more than one a day. According to the International Maritime Bureau, which posts live data on raids, Somali pirates hold 33 vessels and 758 hostages. In January alone the bureau recorded 35 attacks. The raiders took seven ships and 148 new hostages. The United Nations estimates the annual cost of piracy in the Indian Ocean at between $5 billion and $7 billion. Later this month, as the monsoon ends and the seas calm, attacks will multiply and the numbers of ships and hostages held will rise (see chart). Only a handful of attacks make headlines. The British media got into a state about a failed bid in mid-January to hijack The Spirit of Adventure , a cruise ship with 350 British pensioners aboard. A particularly violent rescue carried out by South Korean commandos a few days later attracted coverage, too: they killed eight pirates who had hijacked the Samho Jewelry . Anti-piracy patrols in the Gulf of Aden and the southern Indian Ocean now comprise up to 30 naval vessels. Even so, 2011 is set to be the worst year since Somali piracy revived following the collapse of the short-lived government of the Union of Islamic Courts three years ago.
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Somali piracy takes the form of hijacking and extortion, rather than conventional robbery at sea. This predatory pattern evolved from “defensive” piracy that began early in the last decade as a response by local fishermen, mainly of the Hawiye clan, to unlicensed
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This note was uploaded on 03/25/2011 for the course MKT 359 taught by Professor Pope during the Fall '11 term at Grand Valley State University.

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Piracy - Piracy No stopping them For all the efforts to...

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