Government Expansion for National Security

Government Expansion for National Security - Government...

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Government Expansion for National Security Laws and acts are passed faster and without public opinion or debate and suspicious persons can be deported without ever standing trial. Arguments for this estate that this expansion is necessary to protect us as a society, while arguments against state that this expansion allows the government too much power and endangers the rights of American citizens. After September 11th, President George Bush and Attorney General John Ashcroft enacted several directives geared towards suspected terrorists. Captured members of the Al Qaeda group would face military tribunals versus regular court trials, over 5,000 Middle Easterners living in the United States were pulled for questioning by the government, the Immigration and Naturalization Service held immigrants without disclosing the names of the individuals being held until forced to do so, the information gathering abilities of the FBI were expanded, and the Department of Justice listening to client-attorney conversations when a suspected terrorist was the client were all part of the new directives being pushed through. The argument for increased intelligence is a simple one: the signs of 9/11 happening were present if anyone had chosen to take a look. Al Qaeda groups were increasing the violence, number, and lethality of the attacks being carried out in their name. German intelligence warned of the first attack on the World Trade center in 1993.
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Government Expansion for National Security - Government...

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