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Week 2 - Chapter 4 2 What is the difference between an...

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Chapter 4 2) What is the difference between an as-is system and a to-be system? SDLC is the process by which an organization moves from current system often called the as-is system to the new system often called the to-be system. 4) What are the three basic steps of the analysis process? Which step is sometimes skipped or done in a cursory fashion? Why? The basic process of analysis is divided into three steps: a) Understanding and getting general ideas of the current as in system b) Identifying the system request. c) Developing the requirements for new system and delivering the system proposal. 1 st step is normally system if there is no current system or, if the existing system and processes are irrelevant to the future system. 8) Assuming time and money were not important concerns, would BPR projects benefit from additional time spent understanding the as-is system? Why or why not? BPR is usually expensive, both because of the amount of time required of senior managers and the amount of redesign to business processes. Even though the process is time consuming and does cost money, there is all the necessary answers to questions which may rise in the future after the project is underway. The best analysts will thoroughly gather requirements using a variety of techniques and make sure that the current business processes and the needs for the new system are well understood before moving into design. Without understanding the current system and the necessity for the transition, it becomes extremely difficult for the approval committee to ultimately give a green signal for the entire project. Before the approval committee gives an approval, we need to prove that the requirement is genuinely required. 9) What are the important factors in selecting an appropriate analysis strategy?
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