finalized ppt paper on radio frequency identification

finalized ppt paper on radio frequency identification -...

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From KAKATIYA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE, Warangal 1
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ABSTRACT: RFID technology is being widely embraced in the supply chain, by manufacturers, retailers, and logistics firms. Although its advocates include retail giants like Wal-Mart, not everyone is enthusiastic about its benefits. It is not clear whether RFID is a boon or a curse to the supply chain: the growing market size of this technology may just be an issue of compliance. With a view to establishing the real benefits of RFID, in this paper we present a brief note on working of RFID. And later we explained about its security concerns and its future. Moreover we make short note on tag collision and zombie tags of RFID. At the end we conclude by mentioning its advantages and limitations. INTRODUCTION: What is RFID? RFID stands for Radio-Frequency Identification. The acronym refers to small electronic devices that consist of a small chip and an antenna. The chip typically is capable of carrying 2,000 bytes of data or less. The RFID device serves the same purpose as a bar code or a magnetic strip on the back of a credit card or ATM card; it provides a unique identifier for that object. And, just as a bar code or magnetic strip must be scanned to get the information, the RFID device must be scanned to retrieve the identifying information. RFID Works Better Than Barcodes A significant advantage of RFID devices over the others mentioned above is that the RFID device does not need to be positioned precisely relative to the scanner. We're all familiar with the difficulty that store checkout clerks sometimes have in making sure that a barcode can be read. And obviously, credit cards and ATM cards must be swiped through a special reader. In contrast, RFID devices will work within a few feet (up to 20 feet for high-frequency devices) of the scanner. For example, you could just put all of your groceries or purchases in a bag, and set the bag on the scanner. It would be able to query all of the RFID devices and total your purchase immediately. One reason that it has taken so long for RFID to come into common use is the lack of standards in the industry. Most companies invested in RFID technology only use the tags to track items within their control; many of the benefits of RFID come when items are tracked from company to company or from country to country. Common Problems with RFID Some common problems with RFID are reader collision and tag collision. Reader collision occurs when the signals from two or more readers overlap. The tag is unable to respond to simultaneous queries. Systems must be carefully set up to avoid this problem. Tag collision occurs when many tags are present in a small area; but since the read time is very fast, it is easier for vendors to develop systems 2
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that ensure that tags respond one at a time. How Does RFID Work?
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2011 for the course IT 101 taught by Professor Dontknow during the Spring '07 term at Northern Virginia.

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finalized ppt paper on radio frequency identification -...

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