Residential School - Case Study .pdf - Residential School Case Study PLAN \u200bDisplay the person\u2019s life\/journey in a museum ABORGINAL NAME:\u200b Track of

Residential School - Case Study .pdf - Residential School...

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Residential School Case Study PLAN: Display the person’s life/journey in a museum ABORGINAL NAME: Track of a foot - d'thandoo. CHECKLIST: In your Diorama, ensure you accurately convey the accounts/experiences of one of the four individuals, using a visual that is historically accurate. ***If you would like to use a different individuals experience of Residential Schools in Canada, please see me first for approval. Include a written explanation, detailing the names, dates, and historical events/ individual you chosen. Why were residential school a secret for so long? Why only now are we adequately addressing the issue? Written explanation Mabel Angel Mabel/Harry Fountaine (married name) Mabel Harry Fountaine, a Métis woman who’s a residential school survivor inspired me throughout studying her traumatic, and memorizing story. Not only did she survive the cruel tourture of residential schools, but she also continued thriving throughout her life as a survivor coping with the aftermath that was left upon her. Being the inspiring woman she is today, she reminds her story to inspire, and stand up for what the Aborginal people had gone through. Mabel Angel’s story begins at the age of 7 attending Fort Alexander Residential School in Manitoba, 1953-1960. She recalls stepping into a “super clean, huge, cold, dark building,” and was told by her parents, “to go and be taught.” Her first encounter with the nun, left Mabel a strict, and scary impression. She thought the nun and the priest's outfits were halloween costumes. “They always dressed the same with a big white stiff collar. We never got to see their hair. And long veils, long black dresses. Some of them were fat and some of them were short and some of them were tall and skinny. Some of them had glasses on. All of them were White. And the Priests, the same with the Priests, the same outfit except they had big crosses on. Some of the Nuns had crosses on, or beads, the rosary, a big long rosary. And none of them smiled,” Mabel recalled. Much like other Residential School survivor’s experiences, Mabel’s first day at the Residential School she was taken to a dormitory where she was assigned a bed, had her hair cut short, and was forced to be stripped. Clueless and terrified she was taken to the bathroom where the nuns poured a mysterious green liquid over her body along with other young girls, and was being watched as they washed themselves. She was then commanded to change into
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a dress that she’d wear for the duration of their stay. After, she was taught about Christianity, and would pray on her knees for hours. Throughout those tasks it was very difficult for her to understand, and follow because of the language barrier. She couldn’t understand English or
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