Lec4 - Conventional meanings of Self You have a...

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Conventional meanings of Self You have a self-concept, self-esteem, and self- perceptions. You may be self-absorbed, self-satisfied, self- righteous, self-centered, and/or self-promoting. You can become self-aware or self-conscious. You may strive for self-improvement. You think you know your “true” self.
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William James (1900)
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William James Two senses of self Self as knower Stream of consciousness
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Stream of Consciousness A continuous record of the contents of one’s conscious perceptions, hopes, dreams, thoughts, etc.
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William James Two senses of self Self as knower Stream of consciousness The thing or person inside of us that “knows” ( Homunculus)
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William James Two senses of self Self as knower Stream of consciousness Homunculus Self as knowledge The content of the self-concept
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The Behaviorists Mostly ignored the Self Too cognitive Not-observable Not scientific (They were in a state of self-denial)
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Gordon Allport (1954) Born in Montezuma, Indiana, 1897
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Gordon Allport (1954) So, Allport abandoned the “self-as-knower,” and the field followed suit. Except, perhaps, for very recent work on…
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Experiment on “objective” self-awareness Do task before mirror Do task without mirror Experimental Group Control Group
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Early work: Self-consciousness hinders Mirror No Mirror Self-awareness is an aversive state.
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Later work: Self-consciousness helps Mirror No Mirror Not always aversive…
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Current Theory Self-awareness or self-consciousness makes standards salient. If you don’t feel you measure up, performance suffers.
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Current Theory of OSA If you DO feel you measure up, performance benefits.
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The Self as Content Self-concept False-consensus effect Self-complexity Self-reference effect
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Who am I? (Twenty questions test) I am…______________________________ I am…______________________________
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Lec4 - Conventional meanings of Self You have a...

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