Lec6 - Goals of Social Influence Lecture Be able to...

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3/28/11 Goals of Social Influence Lecture Be able to identify and differentiate between the three types of social influence Understand how opinion conformity can bias group processes Provide 3 examples of weapons of social influence Provide at least 3 examples of
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3/28/11 Social Influence A change in behavior caused by real or imagined pressure from others Attitudes, beliefs, and behavior
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3/28/11 Continuum of Social Influence Conformit y Complianc e Obedience Social
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3/28/11 Conformity Behavior change designed to match the action of others
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3/28/11 Two Kinds of Conformity Normative Informational
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3/28/11 Normative Conformity “Go along to get along” Motive: Need to feel connected to others. Basis: Position taken is more important than reasons for taking that position. Greatest: When group is important.
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3/28/11 Informational Conformity Seek the truth” Motive: Need for mastery, control of environment Basis: Arguments or rationale are as important as the actual position taken Greatest: When answer is ambiguous
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3/28/11 Asch Experiment: Line judging A B C
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3/28/11 Asch Experiment: Line judging >1 Subject s Median
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3/28/11 Asch Experiment: Line judging Trials Nonconforming responses (298) Conforming responses (192)
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3/28/11 Asch Study Normative (not informational) conformity when correct answer is obvious) A B C
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3/28/11 Asch Study Increased conformity with increased difficulty Informational conformity added to normative conformity. A B C
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3/28/11 Factors affecting opinion norms Actual distribution of opinions Apparent distribution of opinions Order of speaking Group values and objectives
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3/28/11 Actual Distribution of Opinion Jury 1: G G G G G G G G G N N N Jury 2: G G G G G G N N N N N N G= Guilty, N =Not guilty Which jury is more likely to reach a guilty verdict?
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3/28/11 Apparent Distribution of Opinion People conform towards the APPARENT norm, not the actual norm. If you can create the appearance that your position is normative, people will conform to it, and it may become normative. Which is one reason that politicians always release biased polls showing that they are more popular than they
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3/28/11 Predict Jury Outcome: Guilty Not Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Guilty Suppose that this is the distribution of opinions in a jury:
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3/28/11 One way to alter the apparent distribution of votes is to mislead: Not Guilty Guilty Guilty A juror could attempt to mislead others about the distribution: Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty Not Guilty
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2011 for the course ECON 252 taught by Professor Robertholand during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Lec6 - Goals of Social Influence Lecture Be able to...

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