2_Perception_IntroPerceptualProcess_PsychophysicalApproach

2_Perception_IntroPerceptualProcess_PsychophysicalApproach...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1.Pictures!!! 2.Questions about Syllabus 3.Syllabus Form 4.Research Participation Form 5.Questions about Readings
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perception - Chapter 1 Goals for today 1. Continuation from yesterday 2.Philosophical considerations 3.Theoretical approaches 4. The perceptual process 5. Methods
Background image of page 2
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World Limited in processing capacity Courtesy of Dennis Santella
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World Limited in processing capacity Courtesy of Dennis Santella
Background image of page 4
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World Visual illusions
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Shepard tables Visual illusions
Background image of page 6
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World One physical stimulus Two possible percepts
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perception Prepare 2 groups
Background image of page 8
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World
Background image of page 10
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World Same physical stimulus Different percepts based on context
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 1.11 Man version of the rat-man stimulus. (Adapted Bugelski & D. Alampay, 1961.)
Background image of page 12
Figure 1.6 Look at this drawing first, then close your eyes and turn the page, so you are looking at the same place on the page directly under this one. Then open and shut your eyes rapidly. ( Alampay, 1961.)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 1.9 Did you see a “rat” or a “man”? Looking at the more ratlike picture in Figure 1.11 increased the changes that you would see this one as a rat. But if you had first seen the man version (Figure 1.8), you would have been more likely to perceive this figure as a man. (Adapted Bugelski & D. Alampay, 1961.)
Background image of page 14
Perception the Perceptual World and the Physical World • Is perception veridical? • Does world we perceive correspond to the physical world that‘s out there?
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Perception and Philosophy the Perceptual World and the Physical World • Is perception veridical? • Does world we perceive correspond to the physical world that‘s out there? • Can we trust our senses to tell the truth? Late 17th, early 18th century: skepticism • John Locke: arm in water basin (subjectivity of perceived qualities of the world) Primary qualities : real qualities actually present in the object (e.g. number, motion, shape…) Secondary qualities : qualities that result from an object‘s power to produce a sensation in us and depend on our state of mind (e.g. warmth, color taste, sound, smell…)
Background image of page 16
Perception and Philosophy the Perceptual World and the Physical World • Is perception veridical? • Does world we perceive correspond to the physical world that‘s out there? • Can we trust our senses to tell the truth? Late 17th, early 18th century: skepticism • David Hume: all sense experiences are subjective and unreliable; perception cannot be understood As to those impressions that arise from the senses, their ultimate cause is, in my opinion, perfectly inexplicable by human reason, and it will always be impossible to decide whether they arise from the object, or are produced by the
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/27/2011 for the course PSYCH V89.0022 taught by Professor Landy during the Summer '08 term at NYU.

Page1 / 53

2_Perception_IntroPerceptualProcess_PsychophysicalApproach...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online