Chinese Religions Response4

Chinese Religions Response4 - Matthew Wong East 252:...

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Matthew Wong East 252: Religions of China January 26, 2011 Response Paper Compare and contrast the Shang versus the Zhou conceptions of the supreme deity, and explain the significance of the differences between the two within the larger context of evolving conceptions of divinity in ancient China. The supreme deity during the Shang dynasty was called Shangdi. There is no direct translation for Shangdi, but Shangdi was worshiped as the Supreme Lord or the High God. Shangdi was described as “aloof, inaccessible, highly potent yet removed from people’s everyday lives and concerns,” (Poceski 17). There is no evidence of routine offerings for Shangdi, yet Shangdi could control the weather and help (or bring misfortune) during military campaigns. The supreme deity during the Zhou dynasty was called Tian, which means Heaven in English. Similar to Shangdi, Tian had authority over the natural world and the human world. Two major differences, however, are that Tian was unambiguously good and that “it exercised its
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2011 for the course EAST 252 taught by Professor Young during the Spring '11 term at Bucknell.

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Chinese Religions Response4 - Matthew Wong East 252:...

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