MN100_lecture_14_2011

MN100_lecture_14_2011 - Lecture 14: Management and national...

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Ed Clark, MN100 1 Lecture 14: Management and national culture Introduction Revisiting the concept of culture: the anthropological roots; Culture and ‘value orientations’ Studies of management and national culture: major studies; Hofstede’s large-scale study Critique of Hofstede: methodological, conceptual and theoretical issues Management issues and national culture: managing across cultures; globalisation – convergence or diversity? Conclusions
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Ed Clark, MN100 2 Efficiency or culture? French bread and German beer
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Ed Clark, MN100 3 The importance of national culture ‘It slowly became clear that national… cultures do matter for management. National… differences are not disappearing. They are here to stay. In fact, these differences may become one of the most crucial problems for management – in particular for the management of multicultural, multinational organizations, whether public or private’ Hofstede, 1990: 392
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Ed Clark, MN100 4 Aims of lecture Consider and clarify the concept of national culture Examine the most influential studies of national culture and management Critically evaluate these studies Briefly look at the implications of national culture for international management issues
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Ed Clark, MN100 5 Surfacing culture Artefacts Espoused values Basic assumptions Observation Questions Inference and interpretation “[culture refers to]… a body of learned behaviour, a collection of beliefs, habits and traditions, shared by a group of people and successively learned by people who enter society” (Mead, 1951)
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Ed Clark, MN100 6 Value-orientations (or basic assumptions) After Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck (1961) How do we perceive… Possible value variants 1. Relationship to nature Dominant Harmony Dominated 2. Nature of human activity Doing Controlling Being 3. Nature of individuals Good Good and evil Evil 4. Relationship to others Individualistic Lateral groups Vertical groups 5. Relationship to time Future-looking Present-looking Past-looking 6. Relationship to space Private Mixed Public (Adapted from Brooks, 2003: 268)
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Ed Clark, MN100 7 Examples of cultural differences External adaptation 1. Relationship to nature Can-do (USA) Insh’allah (Islamic countries) 2. Nature of human activity ‘Don’t just stand there, do something’ (USA) ringi (Japan) Internal integration 3. Nature of individuals Consult and engage (Denmark, Japan)
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This note was uploaded on 03/28/2011 for the course MN 1015 taught by Professor Evangelos during the Spring '08 term at Royal Holloway.

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MN100_lecture_14_2011 - Lecture 14: Management and national...

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