MN100_lecture_3

MN100_lecture_3 - 1 Lecture 3 Oct 12 2010 Dr Eivor Oborn 2...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Lecture 3 Oct 12 2010 Dr Eivor Oborn 2 Lecture 3: Rationality and the origins of the modern corporation 1. Introduction 2. The cultural context of early management thinking 3. Max Weber: rationality and bureaucracy 4. Critiques of Weber and bureaucracy 5. McDonaldisation and rationality 6. Conclusions 3 The context of early management thinking Economic context: the emergence of monopoly capitalism the proliferation and relative dominance of large-scale economic units (Mouzelis, 1967: 79) The cultural imperative of rationality: the long-term emergence of the values of modernity and the demise of traditionalism The key principle of modernism is the application of rational or scientific analysis to social, political and economic affairs work organisation included to achieve greater human control over the world and bring about general progress in the condition of humankind (Watson, 2006, p.36) 4 The values of traditionalism and rational bourgeois capitalism Traditionalism valued Emotion and affect Involvement and partiality Approximation Humanity and mutual care Quality Maana Custom and practice Intuition Capitalism values Reason Neutrality Calculation and precision Efficiency Quantity Speed Formal law Logic 5 6 Max Weber: rationality and bureaucracy the formal rationality of an action is a term used to designate the extent of quantitative calculation or accounting which is technically possible or which is actually applied [in reaching decisions] (Weber, 1968: 85) Bureaucracy is the organisational embodiment of formal rationality, a form of organisation based on calculability and precision compared to other more traditional organisational forms 7 The rise of rational-legal authority Authority of legitimate power, based on grounds of what is accepted as right and just. Three main bases of legitimacy define three main types of authority 1. Traditional authority based on appeals to tradition and customs 2. Charismatic authority based on the appeal of the individual leader 3. Rational-legal authority based on a regulatory order and system of rules i.e. a bureaucracy 8 The ideal typical features of a bureaucracy Structural features:...
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This note was uploaded on 03/28/2011 for the course MN 100 taught by Professor John during the Spring '11 term at Royal Holloway.

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MN100_lecture_3 - 1 Lecture 3 Oct 12 2010 Dr Eivor Oborn 2...

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