2011 Essay Gilgamesh & Monkey

2011 Essay Gilgamesh & Monkey - How To Write an...

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Unformatted text preview: How To Write an “A” Essay Dr. Luke (Chang-shin) Jih Five Prominent Components Sufficient understandings of the subject Persuasive explanation and argument Deep analysis and valid supporting evidences Critical and creative comments and insights Eloquent writing style: thoughts well-organized; good choice of words; correct format of quote, correct grammar, punctuation, spacing; complete foot/end/in-text note, and work-cited. Major Components of Paper Major Introduction Main Body Main Conclusion Either In-text note, Footnote or Endnote Work-cited Introduction and Title Introduction Brief intro to the texts of the Epic of Gilgamesh & Brief Journey to the West (Monkey), and the major characters and narrative (fact-oriented statement, no evaluation) evaluation) A few statements of similarity and differences few between these two scriptures concerning those (two or three) themes you intend to compare (concise; no elaboration; no quotation) A clear and precise statements that layout the clear blueprint of organization/structure of this essay Structure of Main Body Structure The origin, leadership and personality of Gilgamesh The and Sun, Wu-Kong Sun, Their life adventure and relationship with friends Their and mentors Their interaction and relationship with gods/celestial Their beings Their methods of pursuing personal glory and Their immortality and end results of it immortality Others (your own insightful perspective in Others comparing them which is not listed above) Main Focus of Paragraph The origin, leadership and personality of Gilgamesh The origin, leadership and personality of Monkey Contrast and comparison between Gilgamesh and Monkey in terms of their origin, leadership and personality Main Focus of Paragraph The life adventure and relationship with friend and mentor of Gilgamesh The life adventure and relationship with friend and mentor of Monkey Contrast and comparison between Gilgamesh and Monkey in terms of their life adventures and relationship with friend and mentor Main Focus of Paragraph Gilgamesh’s interaction and relationship with gods/celestial beings Monkey’s interaction and relationship with gods/celestial beings Contrast and comparison between Gilgamesh and Monkey in terms of their interaction and relationships with gods/celestial beings Main Focus of Paragraph Gilgamesh’s methods in pursuing personal glory, immortality, and the end results of his efforts Monkey’s methods in pursuing personal glory, immortality, and the end results of his efforts Contrast and comparison between Gilgamesh and Monkey in terms of their methods in pursuing personal glory, immortality, and the end results of their efforts A Good Paragraph Includes Topic three parts Sentence(s) Supporting Sentences Wrapping-up Sentence(s) Topic Sentence It is often (but not always) the first sentence of a paragraph. A sentence that expresses the main idea of a paragraph. A reader should be able to know what the rest of the paragraph will be about by reading the topic sentence. Supporting Sentences The body of paragraph should contain explanations, examples and evidences to prove that your topic sentence is valid. Main body should be separated with transitions words. All of the supporting sentences should be directly related to the topic sentence Avoid irrelevant sentences (focus and focus) Wrapping-up Sentences At the end of a paragraph A or two sentence(s) that summarizes the main idea of the paragraph or restates the topic sentence. A sentence that leads/prepares your readers to the next subject matter. Conclusion at the End of Essay First part: synthesizing the most important ideas First stated in the wrapping-up sentences of each paragraph of main body, and paraphrasing or reinstating them. Second part: your personal reflection and Second insightful comments regarding the subjects. Quotation and Work-cited Quotation Formats of a short and lengthy quote Source of citation Complete information (shorter than three lines; double-spaced) (shorter … Lord Krishna said, “Relinquishing attachment, men of discipline perform action with mind, body, understanding, and senses for purification of the self. Relinquishing the fruit of action” (Author, title of book, page number). …… A Short Quotation Block Citation (longer than three lines; single-spaced; Indented ) (longer …… The dharma of a shudra is to work for the upper three castes. The untouchables were below shudras and excluded from the caste system completely. This next passage describes their status in Hindu society: Dalit (untouchable) status has often been historically associated with occupations regarded as ritually impure… Engaging in these activities was considered to be polluting to the individual who performed them, and this pollution was considered to be 'contagious'. As a result, Dalits were commonly banned and segregated from full participation in Hindu social life, while elaborate precautions were sometimes observed to prevent incidental contact between Dalits and other Hindus…Dalits were forbidden to worship in temples or draw water from the same wells as caste Hindus, and they usually lived in segregated neighborhoods outside the main village (Author, title of book, page number). Author, Works Cited – Book and Article Works The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Babylonian Epic Poem and Other Texts in Akkadian and Sumerian. Penguin, 1999. Ch’eng-en Wu: Journey to the West (Monkey). Trans. Arthur Waley. Grove, 1994. New American Bible. Saint Joseph Personal Size Edition. New New York: Catholic Book Publishing Company, 1992. New The Bhagavad-Gita. Trans. Barbara Stoler Miller. New The York: Bantam Books, 1986. York: Works Cited – Book and Article Homer, The Iliad, trans., Stanley Lombardo. Homer, The trans., Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, 1997. 1997. Homer, The Essential Iliad, ed., Stanley Lombardo. Homer, The ed., Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, 2000. 2000. Wilcox, Rhonda V. "Shifting Roles and Synthetic Women Wilcox, in Star Trek: The Next Generation." Studies in Popular Culture 13.2 (1991): 53-65. Culture Ross, Kelly L. The Caste System and the Stages of Life in Ross, Hinduism. 2005. 9 Nov. 2007 < http://www.friesian.com/caste.htm>. Johnston, Ian. Malespina University. August 2005. < http://www.mala.bc.ca/~johnstoi/homer/iliadessay6.htm>. Internet Resources Book Okuda, Michael, and Denise Okuda. Star Trek Okuda, Chronology: The History of the Future. New York: Chronology: New Pocket, 1993. Journal Article Wilcox, Rhonda V. "Shifting Roles and Synthetic Wilcox, Women in Star Trek: The Next Generation." Studies in Popular Culture 13.2 (1991): 53-65. in Newspaper or Magazine Article Di Rado, Alicia. "Trekking through College: Classes Di Explore Modern Society Using the World of Star Book Article or Chapter James, Nancy E. "Two Sides of Paradise: The Eden James, Myth According to Kirk and Spock." Spectrum of the Fantastic. Ed. Donald Palumbo. Westport: the Ed. Greenwood, 1988. 219-223. Encyclopedia Article (well known reference Encyclopedia books) books) Sturgeon, Theodore. "Science Fiction." The Sturgeon, Encyclopedia Americana. International ed. 1995. Encyclopedia International Encyclopedia Article (less familiar reference Encyclopedia books) books) Second Essay Introduction and Title Introduction Intro to the Bhagavad-Gita, The Torah, and the two Intro themes you intend to compare (factual, brief) A few statements of similarity and differences few between these two scriptures concerning the themes (concise; no elaboration; no quotation) A precise description of the organization/structure precise of main body (a blueprint in how the two themes will be dealt) Dharma verse Commandments The origin of Dharma and the Commandments The nature of Dharma and God’s Commandments The contents of Dharma and Commandments The function of Dharma and Commandments Structure of Main Body Structure Structure of Main Body Structure Status of Minority What are the theoretical foundation by which the treatments of minority are justified? i.e. “Karmic Law” in the Bhagavad-Gita, and Commandments of Yehweh in the Torah How and why those minority/creatures are viewed and treated, i.e. women, slaves, homosexuals, animals, non-believers etc. Structure of Main Body Structure The Good and Evil How are the good and evil distinguished? What are the causes of evil? Are there different kinds of evil? How to overcome the evil? How to achieve the good and virtues? Structure of Main Body Structure Relationship between the Divine and Humans Authoritative Power-controlling Parental-loving Contractual Educational/mentoring Structure of Main Body Structure Characteristics of the Divine Transcendental or Immanent Anthropmorphic or non-anthropmorphic Compassionate, Forgiving, Rational, Vindictive Omnipotent, omniscience, omnipresent Monotheism, Polytheism or Pantheism Exclusive or Inclusive (religious tolerance or intolerance) Writing Sample Title and Introduction Good versus Evil The Bhagavad-Gita and The Torah are two books which direct its followers on good versus evil. The Bhagavad-Gita guides the followers of Hinduism, while the Torah guides its followers of Judaism. Both books strive to educate its readers on teachings by a supreme being and to a human being. Both books discuss the relationship of good versus evil and how men can lead a good life. They both converse about the causes of evil, which are rooted in the natural emotions and depravity of man. Both books give examples of wrong and right actions. To overcome evil in the Bhagavad-Gita people must follow Dharma. In the Torah, God gives Moses the Ten Commandments, to defeat evil. Writing Sample: Good Paragraph The Karmic Law and The Torah each denounce the status of minorities, in specifically women, through the aspects of class and vocation. The Karmic Law binds women to acting prudent and chaste because women must be prevented from ‘being corrupted.’ This is shown fully in a conversation between Arjuna and Lord Krishna: “When the family is ruined, the timeless laws of family duty perish; and when duty is lost, chaos overwhelms the family. In overwhelming chaos, Krishna, women of the family are corrupted; and when women are corrupted, disorder is born in society” (The Bhagavad-Gita, I: 4041). This demonstrates the idea that women are untrustworthy and ignorant since they are easily corrupted. Women are included in the Hindu caste system, but only to the extent that they are in the caste of their fathers, which includes the priestly and educated classes all the way down the system to the untouchables. In the Bhagavad-Gita, Lord Krishna explains to Arjuna that no matter how a man ranks socially, the highest way can be reached despite this and simultaneously denounces women to the lowest capacity by criticizing their sex: Writing Sample: Good Paragraph “If they rely on me, Arjuna, women, commoners, men of low rank, even men born in the womb of evil, reach the highest way” (The Bhagavad-Gita, IX: 32). “The womb of evil” is referring to an action that women have no control of, yet it is referred to as evil. Resembling the treatment of women through the Karmic Law, The Torah condemns women as well. The Torah does not represent women. Throughout the text, the names of women are rarely if ever mentioned. In The Torah, women were created from man, shown in the 2nd chapter of Genesis: “The Lord God then built up into a woman the rib that he had taken from the man” (Genesis 2: 22). God only did this because he felt it was not good for man to be lonely; he needed a companion. Also, in the 3rd chapter of Genesis, Adam and Eve are punished for eating from the tree of knowledge. Adam’s punishment is that he will have to work harder in laborious work. Eve’s punishment is much more extreme: Writing Sample -- Good Paragraph “I will intensify the pangs of your childbearing; in pain shall you bring forth children. Yet your urge shall be for your husband, and he shall be your master” (Genesis 3: 16). This clearly shows the intensity of inferiority between men and women. Women in The Torah are portrayed as insignificant only necessary to clean house and bear children. For example, Moses speaks with Jethro, his father-in-law, about his trip back to Egypt. His wife was not considered an equal partner to make decisions with and never had the chance to be supportive. Also, located in the book of Genesis, is the story of Noah’s ark and the great flood. God Yehweh only came to Noah with the news of the flood and to make a covenant. Noah’s wife was not included in the decision-making or the planning process because of her gender. She is not even named, only referred to as “your wife,” meaning Noah’s wife. Irrefutably, women’s status in both of these religious societies is shown through the texts as being overpowered and dominated by men. ...
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