Chapter 5 - Click to edit Master title style 5 Tsunami...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master title style 5 Tsunami Hyndman/Hyndman Natural Hazards and Disasters , 3 rd Edition http://www.geo.sunysb.edu/openight/ www.stonybrook.edu/sb/provlec March 23: Dan Davis The Earthquake in Japan: What Happened and Why? A member of the faculty in Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences since 1986, Dan Davis is a geophysicist who specializes in tectonics. His research concentrates on the mechanics of convergent plate boundaries, both the continent- continent collisions that create great mountain belts and subduction boundaries like Japan. Other areas of research include the application of geophysics to studies of the recent geological history of Long Island and to nuclear arms control. He is a former faculty Director of Stony Brook's Honors College and co-author of Turn Left at Orion, a well-known guide to amateur astronomers. Abstract: The devastating tsunami and the frightening nuclear crisis in Japan began with one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded. Japan is located at a very active plate boundary, and its tectonic setting places it at high risk for powerful earthquakes, including the type most likely to produce tsunamis. Professor Davis will explore why and how this devastating earthquake and tsunami occurredand what modern geology and seismology can tell us about the future seismic hazards on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. This talk is co-sponsored by the Japan Center at Stony Brook. Wednesday, March 23, 12:50 pm, Javits Center, Room 110 Extra Credit Fig. 5-1, p. 106 Tsunami waves swept away houses and cars in northern Japan and pushed ships aground. The tsunami waves traveled far inland, the wave of debris racing across the farmland, carrying boats and houses with it. Houses were washed away by tsunami in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture in eastern Japan, after Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the northeastern coast. New York Times Magnitude 9.0 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN Magnitude 9.0 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN Friday, March 11, 2011 at 05:46:23 UTC Friday, March 11, 2011 at 05:46:23 UTC The tsunami, seen crashing into homes in Natori, Miyagi prefecture. AP How a Tsunami is generated http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u1xjWO http ://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQ9Mw_rtDn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep2_axA Stepped Art Between earthquakes P ic tu r e 6 Overriding plate S u b d u c t i n g p l a t e P ic tu r e 1 0 Slow distortion P ic tu r e 1 3 During an earthquake Tsunami starts during earthquake Minutes later Tsunami Waves spread Stuck area ruptures, releasing energy in an earthquake Stuck Fig. 5-2, p. 106 Fig. 5-3, p. 107 http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/MediaDetail.php?MediaID=361&MediaTypeID=2 NOAA Movie Tsunami Generation Tsunami: Japanese name for harbor wave Waves rise highest where focused in bays or harbors Sometimes called tidal waves, but not related to tides Most commonly generated by earthquakes Also can be generated by any sudden displacement of large volume of water Volcanic eruptions, landslides or rockfalls, volcano flank collapses, asteroid impacts Earthquake-Generated Tsunami...
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This note was uploaded on 03/28/2011 for the course GEO 107 taught by Professor Stidham during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Chapter 5 - Click to edit Master title style 5 Tsunami...

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