mnemonics(2) - How will you study for Midterm 1 Mnemonics...

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1 Mnemonics How will you study for Midterm 1? Think about models and theories Make connections between relevant ones (Which ones came first? Which explain more?) Think about evidence (experiments) Connect to theories (What is the evidence for this theory?) (What theory or model does this expt support?) Review all concepts and terms Connect the dots! (To contrasting terms, theories, expts) How will you study for Midterm 1? Test yourself!!! See: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/6715.aspx How will you study for Midterm 1? The Testing Effect Phase 1 Everyone studied material for 5 min, then either: More study Recall once Recall 3X Phase 2: Test 5 min, or 2 days, or 1 week later Results of final test: 5 min 2 days 1 week Repeated study group 81% (about =) 40% Repeated test group 75% (about =) 61% See: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/6715.aspx
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2 How will you study for Midterm 1? The Testing Effect Roediger & Karpicke, 2006 How will you study for Midterm 1? The mnemonic benefits of testing: Just studying over and over may lead to a false sense of confidence. "Students who self-test frequently while studying on their own may be able to learn more, in much less time, than they might by simply studying the material over and over again” (H. Roediger) Quizzes may be your best friend! See: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/6715.aspx Mnemonics Tricks or strategies for improving your memory - often, elaboration techniques. especially useful for arbitrary lists of info Memory depends more on how much elaboration you do, rather than on whether you actually intend to remember something What do we remember well? what we practice (rehearsal, procedural) pictures
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3 Memory Exercise Recall as many U.S. states as you can in two minutes What strategy did you use? alphabet cues? visual/spatial? relate to personal experience? What do we remember well? what we practice (rehearsal, procedures) pictures things we can reminisce about High school yearbook study (Williams & Hollan, 1981) Recall names in 10 separate sessions People kept getting more and more names as they thought of more and more cues (friends, clubs, classes, teams, etc.) we remember what we have multiple cues for! It’s all about cues! Depth of processing Meaningful elaboration helps! Encoding specificity A cue’s effectiveness at retrieval depends on its similarity to conditions at encoding!
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