perception_2(2)

perception_2(2) - Perception & Pattern Recognition II...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Perception Recognition II What do you see? Perception is active, not passive. Knowledge, expectations (Top-down processing) PERCEPTION (Bottom-up processing) Sensory input
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
During perception, information is: Omitted Decomposed into features Added Categorized Organized Distorted The Whole Report Procedure An array of 12 letters is BRIEFLY ±ashed onto the screen. After it ʼ s removed, the observer tries to report what they saw. People can typically report only 3-4 of the 12 letters. Does this really mean that only 4 letters made it into perception? Sperling invented the Partial Report Procedure, which answered this question. (Next I ʼ ll cue you for which row of letters to report! The Partial Report Procedure (Sperling, 1960) The subject ²xates on a cross; then letters ±ash onto the screen just long enough to cause a visual afterimage. High, medium, and low tones right after the letters are removed signal which row of letters to report. (Fig. 2.10, p. 31) . The information available in brief visual presentations (Sperling, 1960) If the delay (after the display disappears and before the cueing tone) is short, people can report all or almost all letters in the row they ʼ re cued to report! What does this mean? Reed Fig. 2.11 (p. 32)
Background image of page 2
Evidence for sensory memory (Sperling, 1960) After the display is removed, people can continue to “read” letters off their visual icon if (and only if) they ʼ re able to focus attention on the cued row before the icon fades. Sperling ʼ s discovery led to the idea of an extremely short-lived visual icon (visual sensory store) with unbounded capacity. What happens with different “postexposure Felds”? Without attention, information in the visual icon (VSS) is rapidly lost. (Reed, p. 3, ±igure 1.1) During perception, information is: Omitted Decomposed into features Added Categorized Organized Distorted ±eature integration theory The popout phenomenon, discovered by Anne Treisman This provides more evidence for low- level features, perceived automatically.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
For the next slide, try to react as quickly as possible. You ʼ ll see a feld o± black 0 ʼ s. Slap the desk IF (and only i±) you see the letter V in the feld o± 0 ʼ s. Straight lines pop out in a feld o± curved lines. This task is pre-attentive (doesn ʼ t demand attention). Let ʼ s try it again. Slap i± you see a V. Popout happens ±ast, regardless o± the size o± the display! This means you ʼ re searching it all at once - in parallel. Let
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 19

perception_2(2) - Perception & Pattern Recognition II...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online